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9 votes

Are there land animals that use gill-like organs instead of lungs?

Terrestrial crustaceans are land animals that use gills (or gill-like structures) for gas exchange, though these gills must be kept moist for efficient respiration. Specifically, animals like hermit ...
acvill's user avatar
  • 8,296
8 votes

Are there land animals that use gill-like organs instead of lungs?

Some terrestrial hermit crabs (genus Coenobita) have gills, but these are only partially responsible for their respiration1. These animals carry around water with them in the snail shell they 'wear'. ...
tyersome's user avatar
  • 5,598
8 votes

Cough at 1000 km/h?

This reference from CHEST lists 21 clinically measured peak flow rates during various modes of coughing. Of these patients, and for unassisted cough, the highest peak flow is about 4 liters/sec. The ...
docscience's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Why doesn't nitrogen diffuse into blood?

I like it that nitrogen came to your mind ;) I guess in school they didn't tell you about the nitrogen at all, for the matter of simplification, because it is of no function in the body and the $O_{...
mpribis's user avatar
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6 votes
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What fills the space between the alveoli in the lungs?

Alveolar tree is like a bunch of grapes. If you put a bunch of grapes into a plastic bag and put this bag into another bag, you can imagine how the lungs are covered. Alveoli form the surface of the ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 8,089
6 votes

Why is the partial pressure of oxygen in blood same as that in alveoli

There are three unfounded assumptions in your equation that I can see. You're treating partial pressure as a concentration. Partial pressures are not concentrations, though they're convenient ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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5 votes

Why is there smooth muscle in our bronchioles?

Our airways close up to make them more efficient. The respiratory tree from the mouth to the terminal bronchioles can't absorb oxygen, so each time you breath all the air moved into and out of the ...
Bob bobbington's user avatar
5 votes
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What happens with the nitrogen in blood in membrane oxygenators?

It gets diffused out, like you expected. Grist (2013) writes about this in relation to "the bends," which has already been mentioned by user1136. He writes: Cavitation of blood containing ...
rotaredom's user avatar
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4 votes
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How much oxygen is released by Hemoglobin per 100ml blood

I'd solve differently, in a way that removes some imprecision in your estimates and incorrect assumptions. We care about two points on the graph: saturation at 11 and 2 kPa. At 11 it reads ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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4 votes

Oxygen mask to patients

Oxygen masks can provide up to near 100% oxygen, whereas the atmosphere contains only ~20%. Typically, oxygen is provided in cases where patients' blood oxygen saturation is low or is likely to be low....
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 46.1k
4 votes

What does reflected onto means in the text below?

"Reflected" here describes the relationship between the continuous, but differently named parts of the pleura. The parietal pleura lines the chest wall and mediastinum (costal, cervical, mediastinal, ...
kmm's user avatar
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4 votes
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Entry of particulate pollutants into the nasal cavity

Yes indeed, your quote has things backwards. Here is an image and a link to further information: ref If you follow the dotted line with your eyes - - - - - through the 1Micron grading... On the right ...
bandybabboon's user avatar
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4 votes
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Why does hyperventilation make you feel like you need to breathe more?

Hyperventilation alone does not cause you to feel that you're not getting enough oxygen. Rather, it's what causes hyperventilation that does that (thus resulting in hyperventilation.) The Calm Clinic ...
anongoodnurse's user avatar
4 votes
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Does decompression sickness (the bends) ultimately come from the change in pressure in the lungs, or the actual total ambient pressure over the body?

The solubility of a gas in a liquid is proportional to the partial pressure of the gas above the surface of the liquid Henry’s Law (On the ground at sea level air pressure is about 15psi, nitrogen is ...
Rich's user avatar
  • 326
3 votes

If the effect of increase CO2 in the air has a negative effect, why doesn't decreased CO2 have a positive effect?

3X atmospheric CO2 does not have appreciable cognitive impact. Indoor air typically is already much higher in CO2, especially in a room full of people, because they are all breathing out CO2. It ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 46.1k
3 votes

What fills the space between the alveoli in the lungs?

I agree with Jan's answer generally, but thought I'd clarify a few points. What fills the space between the alveoli in the lungs? As Jan says, alveoli are packed together. In most cases, the thing ...
De Novo's user avatar
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3 votes
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Why does water damage the lungs but amniotic fluid doesn't?

TL;DR: Fetal lungs are filled with lung fluid produced by lung epithelial cells, not amniotic fluid. Amniotic fluid aspiration in utero can be catastrophic. So your question is based on an inaccuracy. ...
anongoodnurse's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Are there any "good" gases which "accidentally" diffuse into the lungs and get exhaled?

Biological scientists do not usually ascribe moral attributes to metabolites, despite the use of the term ‘good’ in reference to lipids by those who communicate with the public. So I think it better ...
David's user avatar
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2 votes
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Which diagram correctly describe an effect of tar entering lungs?

COPD is not caused by an infection (which would require a pathogen) but by the inflammation reaction the body triggers because of the tar particles. Thus the statement "mucus accumulated causing ...
Thawn's user avatar
  • 1,239
2 votes

Why does asbestos cause cancer?

More basic answer; the asbestos crystals have hooks. So the cilia in the lungs have difficulty moving them out with the other dust. This irritates the tissue causing the effects of the first answer. ...
blacksmith37's user avatar
2 votes

What is a deep exhalation/inhalation?

Deep inhalation and deep exhalation are informal terms and cannot be defined by lung volumes, because saying deep by itself does not tell how deep. In the first part of the question deep refers to ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 8,089
2 votes

What is the difference between hilum of the lung and root of the lung?

Short answer: Hilum is an area(has only 2 dimensions) where as root is a body( has 3 dimensions). The root of lung is a short broad pedicle connecting the medial surface of the lung with the ...
JM97's user avatar
  • 4,836
2 votes
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Are the IRV and ERV equal in amount?

You're misunderstanding a bit. Here are some definitions from Wikipedia, where I added some bold for emphasis: Expiratory reserve volume: the maximal volume of air that can be exhaled from the end-...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 46.1k
2 votes

Animal species anatomy

No. Lungs are a feature of tetrapods (land vertebrates) and some lungfish. Many fish have swim bladders, which are thought to be homologous to lungs (they evolved from the same ancestral structure) ...
Oosaka's user avatar
  • 3,253
2 votes
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Why shouldn't there be any air between lungs and ribcage?

The pleural cavity and the airway are separate compartments; there is no anatomical path between them. (Image source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0d/2313_The_Lung_Pleurea.jpg. ...
Adhish's user avatar
  • 1,307
1 vote

What exactly does my body do with oxygen? Why do I need it?

Oxygen is used to oxidize (burn) molecules and generate energy. A fire combines oxygen with carbon containing molecules (like coal) and releases energy (heat) as well as carbon dioxide and water. A ...
Willk's user avatar
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1 vote
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Why is angiotensin converting enzyme localized in the lungs

ACE is present on the luminal surface of vascular endothelia throughout the body and is abundantly present in the endothelium-rich lungs. ACE in the kidney—particularly in the endothelial cells of ...
JM97's user avatar
  • 4,836
1 vote

Why shouldn't there be any air between lungs and ribcage?

Pleural fluid is secreted by the pleural membrane and therefore it is not made up of living cells. Usually a trauma to the chest, such as a stab wound, would allow air to enter the thoracic cavity, ...
Philip.P's user avatar
  • 111

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