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9 votes

Defining "species" (Are species an emergent property or an ensemble of quantitative differences?)

Can we give a robust definition of species? No. Species constantly evolve, diverge, converge, interbreed, and mix and shuffle and trade and spread genes. To draw a box at any particular point in ...
S Pr's user avatar
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9 votes

Basener's ceiling and evolution

Four quick flaws: 1) Environments are always changing. The fitness space is dynamic, and includes both biological and non-biological players, the former which are also ever-changing. Given a ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

Approaches towards a theory of innovation in evolution

The flaw in his argument, from what I can see in your quotes, is to equate evolution to natural selection. Natural selection was never proposed to explain all evolution, nor how advantageous traits ...
rg255's user avatar
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6 votes
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How to find out the when we had a common ancestor with a particular animal

TimeTree [http://www.timetree.org] is one site that allows you to look at times from divergence of various taxa. Their FAQ describes how they calculate the times by pointing to this paper: Tree of ...
iayork's user avatar
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6 votes

Does evolution only give rise to traits that confer fitness?

I'll try to beat @Remi.b to the suggestion that you review Understanding Evolution as a general overview of evolutionary topics. For a quick answer: no. Sometimes people confuse the great ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Does evolution only give rise to traits that confer fitness?

Rephrasing the question Does evolution only give rise to traits that confer fitness? The phrasing is actually a little nonsensical, but it is easy to understand what you mean. The reason is that "...
Remi.b's user avatar
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3 votes
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Do ring species exist?

While no perfect example exists, there are various different 'ring species' in nature where you have which species are able to interbreed with closely related populations, but there are least two &...
Tyler Mc's user avatar
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3 votes
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Examples of points in evolution where two species stopped being interfertile?

Two obvious answers are genome doubling in plants, and Wolbachia-mediated infertility in insects. Both can cause one-generation speciation as measured by lack of interfertility. Polyploidy, which ...
iayork's user avatar
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3 votes

Why is it that evolution of organisms had oxygen as their life-supporting gas?

$\ce{N2}$ may be abundant, but in the environmental conditions typical of Earth today, and back when life appeared, $\ce{N2}$ is nearly inert. That is, $\ce{N2}$ generally doesn't participate in ...
Charles E. Grant's user avatar
2 votes

How do similar environments on islands in close proximity result in allopatric speciation?

The question is a bit confusing because it seems to be built on at least 5 misunderstandings. Allopatry and gene flow [..] allopatric speciation seen in the Galapagos finches. Adaptive radiation ...
Remi.b's user avatar
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2 votes

How does evolution explain the apparation of different group like: mammals, insects etc

Insects and mammals diverged from one-another over 500 million years ago. For most of Earths 4.5 billion year history, life was single-celled, or organized into colonies of single-celled organisms. ...
Karl Kjer's user avatar
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1 vote

At which point does the physical change in evolution occur?

It's somewhat unclear what this question is asking, but it seems like it assumes that evolution is some sort of linear process, which it isn't. You may as well be asking "at what point did latin ...
Jeremiah's user avatar
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1 vote
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How does evolution explain the apparation of different group like: mammals, insects etc

Re a fly evolving into a rabbit, theoretically yes, practically no. Insects (and invertebrates in general) made some evolutionary "choices" like having an exoskeleton & breathing through trachea ...
jamesqf's user avatar
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1 vote

How does evolution explain the apparation of different group like: mammals, insects etc

The two groups that you mention belong to two separated branches in the animal kingdom. The fly and all insects are protostomes and the rabbit and all mammals are deuterostomes. In the first, the ...
heracho's user avatar
  • 737
1 vote

Can the theory of natural selection distinguish between two correlated phenotypic traits?

Are biologists aware of the causation vs correlation problem or are they noobs in statistics? Evolutionary biologists tend to be pretty good statisticians. For historical consideration, Pearson is ...
Remi.b's user avatar
  • 68.2k
1 vote

Is Race the Result of Microevolution

Micro- and macro- evolution are terms vaguely referencing to arbitrary time scales The terms microevolution and macroevolution have rather arbitrary and unclear meaning. For this reason, they are ...
Remi.b's user avatar
  • 68.2k
1 vote
Accepted

Is there a difference between macroevolution and group selection?

Is there a difference? Yes, they are quite different things. What is group selection? Group selection is an view of evolution where selection acts at the level of the group, rather than the ...
rg255's user avatar
  • 16.1k
1 vote
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Is the birds' decision to fly away congenital or learned behaviour?

This example proves IMHO that migration is largely nature and not nurture: In the Netherlands, white storks were bred / reintroduced. A large part (about one third?) of the reintroduced birds do not ...
RHA's user avatar
  • 3,685
1 vote

How to incorporate intraspecific variation in discrete characters in comparative analyzes?

Kostikova et al. 2016. Syst. Biol. developed an algorithm to model trait evolution with inter- and intraspecific variation. The authors use it to show whether a life-history trait (i.e. annual ...
nya's user avatar
  • 191

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