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16S and ITS techniques try to identify organisms in your samples by amplifying short, 'barcode' sequences from each organism's DNA, and using those short sequences to try to identify the organism they came from. 16S can be useful for distinguishing between prokaryotes (bacteria), at least to genus level. It will not always give enough information to ...


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I am going to assume you have a count table that you are starting with. Every tool you decide to use is going to have its own respective instructions so let me get you pointed in a direction to find one that works for you. I wrote a simple R package for my lab awhile back but there are much better ways to put together Co-occurrence networks (in no ...


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Those are some pretty tough samples to get high-quality DNA from, even in a lab. Your best option is probably to place samples in a nucleic acid preservation buffer and carry them out for extraction later. That said, there are some potential solutions. Akonni has some kits that don't use any centrifugation and they claim they'll work on soil and stool, so ...


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I had a look, I can see the data in FASTA format. The accession number is for a project with 50 samples, each of them a sequencing run. First I went to genbank at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ search that accession nunber selecting "all databases" to get the project page here https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/325650 Under "resources" there is "...


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Per my comment to the question, here is an answer to the same question asked on ResearchGate: Whole genome sequencing of human tissue samples often results in reads aligning to bacterial references, and this is actually a method used in the diagnoses of infectious diseases. Understanding the Promises and Hurdles of Metagenomic Next-Generation Sequencing as ...


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