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25 votes
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Are cells guaranteed to get at least one mitochondrion when they divide?

Isn't there a possibility that cell division will result in a daughter cell with no mitochondria? Yes, there is always the possibility. However, there must be a strong negative selection pressure ...
S Pr's user avatar
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13 votes

Are cells guaranteed to get at least one mitochondrion when they divide?

In addition to S Pr's excellent example, I wanted to point out that some very recent research describes some special behavior in oocyte development specifically related to mitochondria selection. ...
Reginald Blue's user avatar
11 votes

3 flaws of genes from the perspective of a programmer

Your individual questions here are reasonable enough - although you could do a bit better at knowing some more details of the systems you are dismissing as 'flawed'. However, I think the bigger ...
gilleain's user avatar
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11 votes

Are cells guaranteed to get at least one mitochondrion when they divide?

A typical animal cell has 1000-2000 mitochondria. From a statistical point of view, assuming a random distribution of the mitochondria and that the cell splits in half, the probability of having 0 ...
Underminer's user avatar
8 votes
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Why does colchicine not affect the source plant itself?

Colchicine is an alkaloid and a secondary metabolite of the plant- a crocus, primarily functioning to protect the plant (like, from consumption by herbivores). WHY COLCHICINE DOES NOT AFFECT THE ...
user 33690's user avatar
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8 votes
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3 flaws of genes from the perspective of a programmer

In programming, if you need to ensure your data has integrity, a single array won't do. We have cyclic dependency checks in programing to determine if the data is corrupt. We have hamming codes to ...
Edwin Buck's user avatar
7 votes
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Could multiplexed CRISPR disable the mitotic and meiotic genes of cancerous cells?

As with all cancer therapeutics one of the biggest problems is how you get the therapeutic to kill cancer cells without also killing so many healthy cells that the therapy kills the patient. For ...
Charles E. Grant's user avatar
5 votes

Why isn't meiosis II called mitosis (as the chromosome number doesn't half)?

Well, in my opinion, the entirety of the meiosis is a process (reproduction of sex cell) in which two levels of division occur, it's all kind of one process. Though meiosis II may seem to have many ...
Alex P's user avatar
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5 votes
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MCQ - Events in the Mitotic cycle

Cell cycle can be divided into two phases: 1. Interphase 2. M-phase(Mitotic phase) Note: M-phase can also mean Meiotic phase but it is not the full form of the acronym. So M-phase in mitosis has ...
Tyto alba's user avatar
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5 votes
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Apart from nerve cells and muscle cells, what types of cells do not undergo mitosis in adult man?

To answer the numbered questions: In general, neurons never divide by mitosis. However, I believe you may have unintentionally misphrased your question; there are functional neural stem cells in the ...
VVayfarer's user avatar
  • 258
4 votes

How are germ cells not reduced in number?

In case of gametogenesis (let us talk about spermatogenesis) gametes are formed from meiotic division of Primary spermatocytes. In Primates Primary spermatocytes are cells that that are formed from ...
Tyto alba's user avatar
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3 votes
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During interphase, is DNA wrapped around histones?

Yes, DNA is always wrapped around histones. DNA condensation using histones is not only meant to form the chromatids for mitosis/meiosis, but also one of the factors that control gene expression. ...
adjan's user avatar
  • 2,106
3 votes

How are germ cells not reduced in number?

"How are germ cells not reduced in number?" It does happen. Germ cells do eventually run out. It is called menopause in women. And age related infertility in men. As for your question of where do ...
JayCkat's user avatar
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2 votes

What are golgi blobs?

What are golgi? Stacked array in the cisternae which are ought to connect vesicles and tubules Made of >1000 different proteins Has the ability to transform/alter in response to a cellular ...
Ebbinghaus's user avatar
  • 2,603
2 votes

From 46 human chromosomes, is each one from a single parent?

Yes, each single chromosome came from one parent. However, it is not true that each chromosome came from one grandparent. Due to crossing over in meiosis, the copy of Chr 1 that you got from your ...
swbarnes2's user avatar
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2 votes
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Mitosis and Colchicine

The question is asking which is NOT true. You are correct that C is true - very few cells should be found in anaphase or telophase. D is also true. When spindle fibres are dissolved, chromosomes/...
Polymania's user avatar
  • 326
2 votes

Why do some organelle (like ER and Golgi complex) cannot be seen under microscope during cell division?

A cell when undergoes the process of cell division there are structures known as spindle fibres that are required to pull the chromosomes off to the poles of the cell so that it can be segregated into ...
Harsimran kaur's user avatar
2 votes
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Purpose of intensive protein synthesis in G1 phase of mitosis

The G1 phase of eukaryotic cell cycle is part of interphase, which is when the cell is replicating its DNA ready for division. To understand the need for intense protein synthesis, we first need to ...
Reece's user avatar
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2 votes
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With over 400 chromosomes, does mitosis in a species of butterfly happen in the same way as in humans?

Mitosis was displayed in a lot of organism, also in organism with a very high number of chromosomes. Here's an example of the analysis made in a fish with an average count of 280 chromosomes. Look at ...
Shred's user avatar
  • 406
2 votes

How does gene affect organs development in eukaryotic cells?

The question is very broad and I think can only be answered in very broad terms. Proteins have metabolic functions. They do stuff! Their actions include catalyzing metabolic reactions, transporting ...
Remi.b's user avatar
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2 votes
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Can a dividing cell that skipped DNA replication become cancerous?

Question 1 Will the Spindle Checkpoint fail due to not having duplicated DNA, or can mitosis complete and form aneuploid daughter cells? Yes it is possible. Meiosis 2 essentially does not involve ...
WYSIWYG's user avatar
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2 votes
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Why is a cell in anaphase (without a nuclear envelope) be considered as a eukaryotic cell?

It is still considered a Eukaryotic cell because the daughter cells and mother cell are both Eukaryotic; the chromosomes will condense and be contained in a Nucleus after Telophase and Cytokinesis. ...
Yashas Ravi's user avatar
1 vote

When two amoeba cells form from one amoeba, does spindle fibers form?

Amoebas undergo binary fission, which is a much more simplistic process than mitosis. In binary fission, the duplicated chromosomes simply separate as the cells is pulled apart. There are no spindle ...
LizFerg's user avatar
  • 146
1 vote

How exactly does mitotic recombination help repair damaged DNA?

Note: the technical term is homologous recombination (as DNA repair is actually its primary function), and this answer focusses on lesions affecting both strands at approximately the same level (as a ...
Vikki's user avatar
  • 240
1 vote
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How are chromosomes counted at the end of mitosis in a plant cell?

I think I know what is confusing you. A chromosome can have one or two chromatids. If you have two chromatids, you don't necessarily have two chromosomes. This is what happens during S-phase, during ...
waterlemon's user avatar
1 vote

Sucrose inhibits onion root mitosis? Why?

tl;dr you are using a lot of sucrose. You would need to show us the data, but I'm not surprised if the plant gets confused / dies/ doesn't know what to do when you add so much. An important aspect of ...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
1 vote

Is aneuploidy/aneusomy only a problem for cell division?

I just want to understand WHY brain cells .... are okay with aneuploidy Great question. The standard hypothesis has been that aneuploidy confers some kind of advantage to the function of the organ (...
tsttst's user avatar
  • 1,597
1 vote

What is the purpose of two cell divisions in meiosis?

For developing a 2N cell, we need a N cell from each parent. In any division(meiosos or meitosis), chromosomes are doubled at first. In firs meiosis a 2N cell in divided into two N cells and as you ...
minasi's user avatar
  • 73
1 vote
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How can I determine where meiosis occurs in the life cycle of a plant?

All of these terms are just names for things that existed long before someone named them, and although you can figure out some of the ploidy from the diagram, you need to know the terms/definitions to ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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