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19

(my comment reiterating the answer seemed useful, so I've reproduced it here) There are "NMDA receptors" in our body. There is not NMDA naturally in our body*. "NMDA receptor" is just a name people gave to one of the receptors that normally binds glutamate. They could have called it something else, like the "slow glu receptor", or "Glutamate Receptor A", ...


4

The two techniques serve different purposes: IP: purifies a protein WB: visualizes or quantifies a protein Most often when I have done IPs (in the hazy past) I have turned around and run the protein out on a WB, so one will frequently combine both techniques. Sometimes a protein is very low abundance so you will not see it in a small volume of crude cell ...


3

While you’re correct that NK cells are often activated (in part) by the absence of MHC-I, they require other signaling events to become fully activated: The Molecular Mechanism of Natural Killer Cells Function and Its Importance in Cancer Immunotherapy. Paul & Lal. Frontiers in Immunology. 2017. Activating Receptors on NK Cells Lack of MHC ...


2

A few things to consider: Template: Are you sure the template you want is on a plasmid, and not in the Rhizobium genomic DNA? (In which case it would not be present in DNA purified with a plasmid miniprep kit - you would need to do some kind of genomic DNA prep instead.) Have you measured the concentration of your template DNA? I typically put ~2-10 ng of ...


2

According to the NEB website FAQ, yes, it can, but less efficiently. "DpnI cleaves hemi-methylated dam sites 60X more slowly than fully methylated."


2

The polymorphism in the gene product of the human ABO locus seems to provide an example of what the question demands. It does not involve a gene duplication or recovery from loss of function; rather it involves changes that cause interactions with a different ligand, and the mutations that produce these changes have been identified and examined at a ...


1

There is no clear-cut line between "synthetic" and "natural" substances. They are made from the same kinds of atoms using the same kinds of covalent, ionic, and other types of bonds. The fact that a substance MAY be produced by some organism by biological processes does not make it any different from the same substance made in a laboratory by a human ...


1

One of the reasons why region may not be amplified via PCR is that the region is much larger than is thought. This may happen if there is a repeat of variable length in the region that may be difficult to sequence precisely, or have a different length in your sample than is shown inside NCBI database. In the case we hit it was Homo sapiens. I am not sure ...


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