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No, Cas13 can't be used to edit DNA. Cas13 does not contain nuclease domains RuvC and HNH domains responsible for DNA cleavage, so they cannot directly edit the genome. For that Cas9 and Cas12a is used.


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N1-methyl-pseudouridine occurs naturally in the tRNAs of most archaea. It replaces the ribothymidine found in the TΨC-loop of eubacterial and eukaryotic tRNAs. Although the enzyme responsible for the conversion of uridine to pseudouridine has been known for some time, it is only relatively recently (2012) that the gene for the methylation of the ...


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Let me focus on the necessary and sufficient part: such a language is suitable in mathematics, but does not really have much meaning in evolutionary/statistical context. Instead we talk about rejecting the null hypothesis, which does not mean accepting the alternative hypothesis. Equally, a failure to reject the null hypothesis does not mean that this ...


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The discovery of peptidoglycan, as present in the bacterium cell wall took many years. “The terms mucopeptide, glycopeptide, or murein, used by some authors, are all synonymous with peptidoglycan.” [Ghuysen, J.M. (1968) Bacteriol. Rev. 32:425-64] Among those, Weidel and Pelzer previously coined the term murein [Weidel, W. and Pelzer, H. (1964) Adv. Enzymol. ...


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Compartments A two-dimensional fluid like structure, like a phospholipid bilayer, can generate closed surfaces that can envelop an entire region of space. This is what allows life to compartmentalize, to create separate pocket environments that are set apart from their surroundings. A single compartment generated by a single bilayer folding in on itself is ...


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Yes, this is perfectly fine. Many companies sell PCR Master Mixes (granted, without primers): Thermo Fisher Sigma-Aldrich BioRad Promega Qiagen If you choose to make your own, make sure it's stored at -20°C, and be sure to aliquot it so it's not going to be subjected to multiple freeze/thaw cycles. Obviously you should mix it well before aliquoting, but ...


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They are different normalizations of the same number. It's the question of whether you want to know how many mutations can be expected at a single position in a genome, or whether you want to know how many mutations occur across the entire genome. See wikipedia, for instance: There are several natural units of time for each of these rates, with rates being ...


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