100

No, this is not possible. There are a few reasons for that, but most important are that the only thing a mosquito injects is its own saliva, while the blood is sucked into the stomach where it is digested. To be able to infect other people HIV would need to be able to leave the gut intact and then also be able to replicate in the mosquitos which it cannot ...


17

A mosquito's proboscis isn't like that of a butterfly, which could easily have nectar clinging to it when it is coiled up; instead, consider that the part of the mosquito's proboscis that enters a blood vessle is probably wiped clean when it is retracts outward through the epithelium. A a dirty needle or razor is many, many times larger than the sucking ...


12

I am not a medical doctor but in my view this is within the realms of possibility. The probability has been estimated by Princeton at 1 in 10 million. This is per bite, assuming - I presume - that the mosquito that bit you was just feeding on an HIV-infected person of sufficiently high viral load. It is not against the laws of Physics that blood cells can ...


8

Probably not. An immediate defense against predators requires an immediate response. The sting of Hymenoptera like the wasps and bees has an immediately painful reaction. In addition, in the eusocial (colony-forming) species, multiple individuals typically contribute to defense of their nest. One sting may not deter a predator or invader but dozens or ...


6

What you're talking about is called mechanical transmission (at least in veterinary and medical circles; plant epidemiologists call it something different). There's a nice overview by Gray and Banerjee here, although it's a bit old. The short answer is that blood-feeding insects can mechanically transmit a range of pathogens, including viruses. Mosquitoes ...


6

I originally thought there was no way anyone had studied this - it felt like one of those questions we get here a lot where people seem to assume "scientists know (almost) everything" - but I decided to give a check anyways. Short answer There is in fact evidence that some insects could be scared to death. However, the process is a bit less dramatic than ...


5

We now know based on a twin study that attractiveness to mosquitos is heritable (with a fairly high heritability of 0.62). Based on a genome-wide association study (GWAS) [which is probably the study referenced in the youtube video] we have found some of the genetic loci that control attractiveness; in particular, 15 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ...


4

Via Wikipedia: The virus is transmitted in saliva to a vertebrate host when an infected mosquito takes a blood meal. It thus cycles between mosquito and vertebrate amplifier hosts, mainly white-tailed deer. In a study from Newfoundland, JCV was significantly associated with large mammals such as sheep, cattle and horses. In Michigan and Ontario moose and ...


2

Nice question! Basically, the mosquito does not only suck; it also injects some saliva into the host with its saliva glands. From National Geographic: The mosquito starts salivating as soon as it probes the [host]’s skin, releasing substances that prevent blood vessels from constricting, stop blood from clotting, and prevent inflammation. Sometimes, ...


2

It could be a number of things. Mosquitos need standing water. Look for that. Any changes? Was last year particularly rainy? One group of mosquitos lays its eggs at the waters edge. They lie dormant until the water reaches them again. If the water was high when the eggs were laid, then recedes, it may be years before the water reaches them again and the ...


2

Night-time mosquitoes sense IR, UV and CO2 and aromatics as well as colors. Mosquitos can smell blood through the skin too. https://www.asianscientist.com/2015/10/in-the-lab/mosquitoes-detect-veins/ Black converts the most sunlight to infra red, and white does the least. 2009 Significantly more Anopheles quadrimaculatus females were aspirated from resting ...


1

It is not an urban myth. UV and blue lamps are good insect attractants. They have been used for many decades in insect traps, and these too work for mosquitoes. These lamps are routinely used in ecology at insect sampling sites. In some cases, such as with diurnal moths, yellow lamps can also be good attractants. The reason why UV is applicable is because ...


1

It happens I just found an answer to my question in a recent review book by George Heimpel and Nicolas Mills. It appears that for now we do not know any parasitoid of mosquitoes. Quoting chapter 1 : "Most insect herbivore species are attacked by one or more parasitoid species, but some major arthropod pest groups appear to be entirely free of ...


1

In accordance to the article Using mobile phones as acoustic sensors for high-throughput mosquito surveillance mobile phone microphones can detect moscitos in 10 to 100 mm range (depends on a model). In an empty room mosquito can be detected at approx. 3 m (Sound Pressure Level).


1

Check "breeding temperature" and similar obscure phrases for the search. There's a study on physical aspect of mosquitos bred in cold, they perhaps didn't note any significant metabolism change, you can read the articles, they mostly cover wing length scales and follicles. There's a study on lave development speed which passes over breeding temps, it may ...


1

Short answer Mozzie preference to colors depends heavily on the species under investigation, as well as the specific preference test used. Background Mosquito color preference has been investigated mostly by investigating their preference of oviposition (the process of laying eggs). When given the choice between black and white containers, ...


1

Male and female pupae are consistently slightly different sizes. This isn't particularly obvious to look at them, but allows them to be sorted mechanically by using two sheets of rigid, waterproof material (aluminium, glass or acrylic) fixed at a slight angle to each other, and washing the pupae down between them until they get stuck. The pupal sorter in ...


1

The amount (percentage) of eggs to mature varies greatly and depends on many factors and off course varies by season. The correct (but not really satisfying) answer is that from every 100 eggs, between 0 and 100 eggs will mature. On average, this number is greater than 1 (otherwise the species would go extinct), and much smaller than 100 (otherwise the ...


1

Mosquitoes do not rely on a single cue to find its host. It is the combination of CO2, temperature and odor cues, that makes mosquito an efficient blood feeder. These two papers might help you in understanding how mosquitoes target their hosts. Genetic analysis of mosquito detection of humans Multimodal Integration of Carbon Dioxide and Other Sensory Cues ...


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