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One of the physical limits to biological flight is muscle physiology. Muscle force output is proportional to muscle physiological cross sectional area (PCSA) multiplied by its specific tension (Gans, 1982): $$F = \text{PCSA} \times \text{Specific Tension}$$ PCSA is basically just the cross-sectional area of a muscle adjusted for its architecture. Pennate ...


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This is because of the difference in mitochondrial protein expression of red and white muscle fibres. There is difference in posttranslational modification, which leads to functional difference as red muscle contraction is slow, and white muscle contraction is rapid. Metabolic control in mitochondria contributes in speed of activity and cellular energy ...


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The human body can not store Proteins (technically). BACKGROUND : PROTEIN is a very broad term and there are hundreds and thousands of proteins.[1] Proteins are heteropolymers consisting of amino acids held by peptide bonds. Amino acids : There are 9 amino acids which we need to intake. Phenylalanine, valine, threonine, tryptophan, methionine, leucine,...


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Your body in this case is generating more "power" by having something to push against. When flicking your finger, your finger is pushing against your thumb and that pressure you feel is the force of both your finger against your thumb and your thumb against your finger. This is important as you can only apply so much force to a mass before it gives out and ...


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That's a really interesting question! What might help you the most is reviewing hand and forearm muscle anatomy. I have some examples that could help. The flexor digitorum profundus and flexor digitorum superficialis are hand muscles that originate in the forearm region. At the wrist they split into four tendons (so FDP has 4, FDP has 4) one for each non-...


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I'll add a more straightforward answer than the previous answerer (who was certainly more in-depth and informative than I will be), for the purposes of clarity. I think protein is stored in the body very much functionally, just not in reservoirs of reserve chemical energy such as adipose tissues do with fat. I am interested to know if a human body can ...


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Skeletal muscle cells are excitable, like neurons. Enough summation of end-plate potentials causes the cell to reach threshold and fire an action potential (which then spreads throughout the cell membrane through positive feedback, just like a neuronal action potential). There are some differences between skeletal muscle and typical neurons, like greater ...


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