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Sadly the site you referenced is not scientific. There is no scientific basis for a claim that "there is a 7% chance that two brown-eyed parents will have a green-eyed child". It is correct that multiple genes determine eye color, and the effects of some depend on the versions (alleles) of the other genes present, so predicting eye color is not as ...


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To my knowledge, Chomsky does not claim that there is a specific gene or mutation responsible for the human linguistic abilities - at least not in strictly biological sense. The claims of Chomsky and his followers, known as generative grammar, are more general: the study and the comparison of many human languages have shown that all the languages are ...


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I like @mgkrebbs answer, I think that it hits most of the high points, but I wrote a review on this subject a couple of years ago where we specifically put together estimates on the mutational load of different mutation classes (see Table 1). Yaniv Erlich's group directly addressed the question that you are trying to answer, and they estimated that ...


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It's not really clear to me what you're after when you ask about how prominent or dominant these two kinds of variations are. But let's look deeper. Guichoux et al. (1) say: There are two main differences between SSRs and SNPs. First, SNPs are more numerous than SSRs in the genome of most species. On average, in the human genome, there is one SNP every 100–...


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