12

You might want to look for asymmetric dispersal. Asymmetric dispersal has been found in many freshwater fishes (such as bullhead; Junker 2012), freshwater mussel (Terui et al., 2014) and in marine kelp (bull kelp; Collins et al., 2010). That being said asymmetric dispersal does not mean that dispersal goes exclusively one way. Maybe Blondel et al. (2020) ...


5

I think that many of the applications that you mention require wildly different numbers of individuals. It would help to know more about goals, questions, organism details, etc. For example, for simple population statistic estimates, you can depend on the large number of sites in the genome to get an accurate estimates (such as Watterson) from a single ...


2

Yes, in neutral theory of evolution this is called fixation - when all the alleles (for a given locus) become identical. Note that it may happen, even if the gene does not have a striong selective advantage - due to the random effects. If you are looking for the basic background in population genetics, Gellespie's book is a good starting point.


2

You are right in a sense. The processes which generate mutations in an organism are stochastic (not quite exactly random, but in most organisms they are effectively random for all intents and purposes). In terms of population genetics, it is considered that mutations occur randomly across the genome and have an equal probability of occurring at a given base ...


1

Exactly . Paralogs and orthologs , both go under natural selection. But harmful mutations tend to have a less fatal effect if they happen to paralogs as there would be a backup for the malfunctioning protein. In paralogs, if a bad mutation happens to a protein, the paralogous protein will compensate and help the organism maintain its function but in ...


1

This question seems to be about negative/purifying selection, judging by the wikipedia quote. Positive selection can often (but not always) occur more slowly in smaller populations, but 'efficiency/effectiveness' of selection generally means the rate at which deleterious variants are purged from the population, so I'll skip out taking about positive ...


1

I know this question is a bit old, but I read a paper recently which (claimed) to answer this question. I think the answer to this question is suprisingly controversial. I don't really have a formed opinion yet of which answer is correct, but I will try to discuss the different viewpoints here. Argument 1: Sweeps are rare On one hand, we have the people who ...


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