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This was a question on the 2016 Toronto Biology Exam, precisely question 42. Though the question was asked vaguely, d is the best answer. It's quite obvious that if animals are in water, fins will eventually evolve to improve fitness, that's pretty obvious. However, if they are both in water, why are their fins different? This touches on the more complex ...


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It is not an urban myth. UV and blue lamps are good insect attractants. They have been used for many decades in insect traps, and these too work for mosquitoes. These lamps are routinely used in ecology at insect sampling sites. In some cases, such as with diurnal moths, yellow lamps can also be good attractants. The reason why UV is applicable is because ...


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The topic is called Peto's paradox, you can find references to studies on the wiki page, here's a summary: A rat cell is more likely to get cancer than an elephant cell in the same time span. Mice have cancers in 2 years as often as humans have in 60 years. Studies find that 4 ton elephants have only 4 times more blood cells than a 12 gram shrew. They ...


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Their arguments for increased telomere length in lab mice are: Rate of tumour formation is dependent on the number of cells within an organism. Additionally, tumours take time to form. Therefore, small animals that only need to reproduce early in life, like lab mice, are less prone to tumours and there is then less selective pressure favouring telomere ...


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