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In unmyelinated axons, there are voltage-gated ion channels along the entire length of the axon. Depolarization in one segment depolarizes and opens ion channels in the adjacent segment, which further depolarizes the next segment, etc. Myelinated axons are built differently. They have stretches of myelinated axon which are (mostly) free of voltage-gated ...


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Myelinated axons have schwann cells around them, electrically insulating the neuron axons except for gaps in the sheath which are called the Nodes of Ranvier. The insulation increases the speed of transmission of action potentials. Without myelination conduction signals along the nerve can be impaired or lost. There are some diseases E.g. Acute disseminated ...


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Graphs like these are based on a complete cross-sectional area. Myelination adds thickness, so if you want to add myelin outside and keep the same diameter, you have to have a smaller lumen inside the axon. As you can see in the "unmyelinated" plot versus diameter, smaller fibers have lower conduction velocity. Since the benefits of cross-sectional ...


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That's observed due to passive conduction. With more area of cross section resistance is decreased (ohm's law). Myelin has just function of insulation the graph showing conduction in neuron fibre varying with thickness of neuron (hereby also thickness of myelin sheath). Conduction is ruled by multiple factors not only just thickness of insulation. check this ...


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Clarification I am unclear of your aim. What feature of elecrophisiology do you want to characterize? What do you mean by large scale? E.g. Micrometers (μm), Milimeters (mm) or Centimetres (cm). Magnetic resonance microscopy imagings at Micrometers (μm). Answer An established way to observe neuron propagation is the use of calcium imaging. You can take a ...


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