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Short answer Yes, we can see with our ears. Background Bach-y-Rita famously stated "We see with our brains, not our eyes". Bach-y-Rita worked for decades on sensory substitution. Sensory substitution approaches in general aim to replace for a lost sense by redirecting information normally captured by that sense to another still functional one. Bach-y-Rita ...


6

The study you linked was very interesting, and there is a reason that the authors of this paper and many others like it refer to grey matter density or grey matter volume. From another study on grey matter (density), Neurolinguistics: structural plasticity in the bilingual brain, Whether grey-matter reorganization in this region is related to changes in ...


4

I have had a very difficult time finding information that was well-written and what you were looking for. So, I did my best! From what I have read it takes about four months - everyone is a little bit different and some take longer! Those of us with no visual impairment that try to learn it have no advantage and maybe a slight disadvantage with learning it.....


3

Your question is basically a matter of defining brain plasticity or more broader, neuroplasticity. According to a well-cited paper in Brain (Cramer et al., 2011) neuroplasticity is defined as: [...] the ability of the nervous system to respond to intrinsic or extrinsic stimuli by reorganizing its structure, function and connections. Hence, the term can ...


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This is a good first source which suggests further references: http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Balance_of_excitation_and_inhibition


3

As far as I can see this paper is being a little misleading, by saying "VPA mimics Nogo-66 receptor deletion". The action of VPA doesn't seem to be related to this receptor. It seems that blocking this receptor and applying VPA both increase plasticity, but it is like taking a car or taking a train -- entirely different modes of transport that achieve the ...


2

At least two follow-up studies have investigated the behavioral consequences of the re-routing of the optic nerve to the auditory cortex. In these animals the visual cortices were ablated, and the optic nerve re-routed by combined lesions of the superior colliculus and ascending auditory pathways to the thalamus. These lesions induce retinal axons to form ...


1

You should see some talks from TED about deep sleep. One researcher summarized that adults generally need 8 hours every night to be at optimum strength. What is most important though is the Delta-wave sleep that occurs during very deep sleep. To accelerate the process: It's pretty fringe research, what he said is early days... Alledgedly, playing a ...


1

Various forms of plasticity has been reported for inhibitory-excitatory synapses as well. See below figure from [Woodlin et al. 2003]. Holmgren CD, Zilberter Y (2001) Coincident spiking activity induces long-term changes in inhibition of neocortical pyramidal cells. J Neurosci 21: 8270–7 Woodin MA, Ganguly K, Poo MM (2003) Coincident pre- and postsynaptic ...


1

One of the "Boss references" (nearly 11000 citations right now) for this is Bliss and Collingridge, A Synaptic Model of Memory: Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus. Being from 1993, it has references to some of the earlier work in this field (if that's what you're looking for). It notes the different forms of NMDA-dependent and independent plasticity. ...


1

I would like to add to the great answer by AliceD with my own experiment. I wish to add this because the results, while intellectually natural, were intuitively fascinating, and because my sample size is tiny (read: N=1), and I'd love to have others go out and repeat the experiment. I don't quite show that you can see with your ears, but I do think it ...


1

Adaptation to altered vision is probably most well-investigated using prism-glasses. Prism glasses can shift the visual horizontally, for example by 20 degrees (Redding et al., 2005): The use of horizontal shifting goggles has been investigated intensively to treat the symptoms of attentional neglect. Neglect occurs due to unilateral parietal brain lesions. ...


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