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In brief, so far as we can tell size matters far less than brain architecture. Consider that humans have only about half as many cortical neurons as a number of whales, yet are clearly far more intelligent. While we are still far from a complete understanding of the details of how intelligence actually works, neuron count is only part of the story. For ...


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High Speed vs High Frequency For starters, what you are describing is a high frequency signal, not necessarily a high speed signal. High speed signals are caused by myelination (a sheath of fat deposits that encases neuron fibers), and by minimizing the number of actual dendrite/Axon junctions you need to pass through to get from point A to point B. In ...


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Synapses are pretty much one-to-one Here's some EM pictures of synapses, from Wikimedia commons: You should gather from these images that these are super organized structures. There's a dense, dense gathering of cellular machinery at the synapse that creates a dark electron-dense region shown by the arrows. There's no room for more than one cell to be ...


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Short answer Several to thousands of vesicles per synapse. In the cortex, 0-1 are released per typical synapse. At neuromuscular junctions or specialized CNS synapses there can be more. Longer answer It doesn't make much sense to talk about an "average", since there are different types of synapses with very different properties, but we can talk ...


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Some animals can respond to sound in the microsecond range. They think that it's by using big groups of neurons working at the same time. Indeed, 1 cubic millimetre can contain 50,000 neurons / many receptors. ref:https://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.2006422 Echolocating bats are powerful models for investigating the ...


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