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8 votes
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What is the name of the bond between phosphate and the sugar in a nucleotide?

Phosophoester is a valid term. There are at least a 1000 peer-reviewed articles that use this term. IUPAC Goldbook defines nucleotides as: Compounds formally obtained by esterification of the 3 or ...
WYSIWYG's user avatar
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8 votes
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According to an online course, ribose and adenine can bond to make ATP. Is this true?

The structure shown is indeed of guanine, not adenine. A nucleotide is defined as being composed of a nitrogenous base, a pentose sugar and phosphate (see, e.g. the Wikipedia entry). So the simplest ...
David's user avatar
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7 votes
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Why calf thymus DNA is widely used instead any other body part?

I have crawled through google and many, many journal articles. What I can make of it, is: "It is generally agreed that from mammalian cells (as, for example, calf thymus..." are capable of yielding ...
GrumpyMammoth's user avatar
7 votes
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Which statistical test should be used for GC-content comparison?

You could try a permutation test. These are a kind of non-parametric statistical test which involve creating your own null distribution from your data. Your hypothesis $H_{1}$ in this case, is that ...
user438383's user avatar
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5 votes
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Structure of phosphates in nucleotides

Well it turns out that when nucleotides are bonded together in a strand of DNA/RNA (nucleic acid) they ALWAYS HAVE only one phosphate group attached to their nucleoside (nucleoside = sugar + ...
Alex P's user avatar
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5 votes
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Can DNA be denatured at acidic pH?

Alkaline denaturation neutralize the charge of acids but also cause hydrolysis of bases upon prolonged treatment. Strong bases will raise pH until the H+ shared between the N-base electronegative ...
Ak2817's user avatar
  • 391
5 votes
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Methods of investigating the occurrence of non-standard bases in nucleic acids

General approach to identifying non-standard bases in organisms Purify from source material with standard separation methods Identify using chemical methods and comparison with known compounds ...
David's user avatar
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4 votes

Why don’t different organisms have nucleic acid genomes containing different bases and sugar?

Everyone is giving you a hard time for this question. But it's a great question! Good for you for asking it. The answer is that we really don't know why nucleic acids are composed of ribose, as ...
Sara's user avatar
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4 votes
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DNA methylation and the validity of the definition of epigenetics

A methylated nucleotide is the same nucleotide, for the purposes of base-pairing events. The methylated base will be paired with its Watson-Crick opposite after replication, for instance (and ...
Alex Reynolds's user avatar
4 votes
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Sequence of DNA

DNA sequence is what we call a string of nucleotides in the DNA polymer, such as GATTACA, representing a chemical structure wherein each letter ("G", &...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
3 votes
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Misincorporation of dUTP into DNA?

There follows an attempt to answer my own question, which I think is important to consider in the general context of postings on SE Biology concerning uracil and thymine in DNA and RNA synthesis. ...
David's user avatar
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3 votes

What is the actual size of a nucleotide?

If you want experimental papers, we should be precise about what we're measuring. "The dimension of a nucleotide" is rather imprecise, as a nucleotide is a rather oblong, knobbly thing. 0.34 nm is a ...
R.M.'s user avatar
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3 votes

What could I call such nucleic-acid-Sequence? A sort of palindromic sequence? is there any term called mirror repeat?

The term: ‘reverse tandem repeat’ has been used by a few authors, but the Google search engine retrieves only 28 instances, of which no more than 20 are unique. There are about three times as many ...
3 votes
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What could I call such nucleic-acid-Sequence? A sort of palindromic sequence? is there any term called mirror repeat?

I think the situation you showed should be called mirror-everted repeats: to my knowledge they occur very rarely, and I only found references in this and this articles, even though no graphic ...
Roberto Preste's user avatar
3 votes

Why don’t different organisms have nucleic acid genomes containing different bases and sugar?

It sounds like you are confused about how Darwinian evolution "works". For example, as we survey the current life forms in this biosphere there is absolutely no evidence that these species (or their ...
mdperry's user avatar
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3 votes

Why don’t different organisms have nucleic acid genomes containing different bases and sugar?

You are incorrect in your assertion that: …there are NO nucleic acids found naturally that are made of different bases or sugars Different bases are found in the anti-codon loop of transfer RNA, ...
David's user avatar
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3 votes
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Are DNA molecules negatively charged at low pH values?

You are right. At a ph<5 which is where the PI of DNA breaks down, the phosphate group will bind protons, while the nitrogenous bases will become positively charged owing to the acidic environment.
Shivansh Kanojia's user avatar
2 votes

Is nucleoside-triphosphate delivery to RNA or DNA polymerase active or passive?

Many processes in the cell, also processes involving compounds that have a lower abundance than the NTPs, rely on stochastic diffusion. Even the polymerase is not actively transported to the nucleic ...
VonBeche's user avatar
  • 1,473
2 votes

Is nucleoside-triphosphate delivery to RNA or DNA polymerase active or passive?

The amount of dNTPs is so important and sensitive the level of dNTPs should be optimum not lower or higher. Lower amounts lead to insufficiency and higher amounts lead to increased mutation rates. ...
BlueFoxy's user avatar
  • 384
2 votes
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amount of tRNA and its extra arm

With respect to at least two sources I could find, tRNA is commonly reported as encompassing 15% total RNA in both rapidly-dividing mammalian cells such as HeLa, and in S. cerevisiae (1, 2). To give ...
CKM's user avatar
  • 8,109
2 votes

Spectrophotometric Values of Individual Nucleotides

If it's so important to you that you need a quotable source for this, I'd measure it myself with the equipment I use for the real experiment. Otherwise I'd suggest you look at a chemical database ...
VonBeche's user avatar
  • 1,473
2 votes

What could I call such nucleic-acid-Sequence? A sort of palindromic sequence? is there any term called mirror repeat?

As an example of biological symmetry, with my tongue in my cheek, I would call this a mirage. My reason is that from a structural point of view a sequence of the type you present: ...
David's user avatar
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2 votes

Why are GC-rich regions less condensed than GC-poor regions?

@ThoH.Ho and @Thawn. When banding chromosomes they are first treated with trypsin before staining with Giemsa dye. My understanding, and I have worked in the field of cytogenetics for quite a while, ...
NugFow's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

Do right-handed helices bind to right-handed helices, and vice versa?

My understanding is that protein and DNA helices show the handedness that they do due largely to the intrinsic chirality of their components. Note that in natural biomolecules L-amino acids and D-...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
1 vote

What is the name of the bond between phosphate and the sugar in a nucleotide?

Expanding on WIYSIWG's correct answer: Each nucleotide contains one phosphoester bond (between a phosphate O and sugar 5'-C). Additionally, two nucleotides are connected by one phosphoester bond (...
electronpusher's user avatar
1 vote

Can something cause both breaks and cross-links in DNA?

Cisplatin forms DNA-protein crosslinks (so DNA-protein-DNA by extension) in vitro [1] and a review [2] says that cisplatin leads to DSBs (although I can't access the primary source at the moment). But ...
user40950's user avatar
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1 vote
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Notation for repetitive nucleic acids

dN denotes deoxyribonucleoside (where N can be A, T, <...
WYSIWYG's user avatar
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1 vote

Can I ask tip for tissue measuring(especially for RNA preparation)?

I do not have specific experience with liver tissue, but here I would do a couple of things. First, to get around your issues with weighing tissue, set an acceptable range around 20 (say, plus or ...
porkchop's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote

How to choose right volume of DNA and SYBR Green

I had to look it up online, but I eventually found here an important information: the detection limits of SYBR Green. dsDNA at 300nm transillumination: 60 pg Oligonucleotides at 300nm ...
Guillaume's user avatar
  • 715

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