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8 votes
Accepted

Can a hemorrhage occur after death?

Usually,blood moves through the body by force from the contraction of ventricles, the contraction on muscles, gravity, or other forces. At death, the only force left is gravity, which is why we see ...
anongoodnurse's user avatar
5 votes

Does the palate truly house the sense of taste?

Although @MattDMo's post rightfully suggests that gustatory senses are achieved primarily by lingual taste buds and olfactory nerves, he has actually missed that there ARE in-fact palatal taste buds. ...
theforestecologist's user avatar
5 votes

Why Is Most Life Symmetrical Externally But Not Internally?

You change one thing and you have to change everything else to compensate. Lets look at what organs are not symmetric in tetrapods, the heart and the digestive system, everything else is symmetric. ...
John's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Medical term for "holding urine for a long time"

A swollen organ may be described as distended if the swelling is symptomatic of a medical disfunction. The purpose of most bladders is to collect and retain a fluid; if that fluid needs to be ...
can-ned_food's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Organ and Bone Marrow Transplantation?

As Mowgli pointed out, a bone marrow transplant involves destroying the patient's own immune system with radiation and, essentially, replacing it with a new one from the bone marrow donor. If you did ...
divibisan's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Why can't humans use dietary citric or acetic acid as a primary source of energy?

Why can't eating citric acid be used as a temporary primary source of energy - in place of fat/carbohydrate/protein? No reason it can't. Citric Acid technically contains 2.5kcal/g -- which is almost ...
MCM's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Can 1.5 gigabytes encoded in the human genome really account for the complexity of a human being?

This is a VERY hard question to answer; I think mostly because it is very hard to think about how the DNA actually encodes information. The first important thing to note (and also the only direct ...
Nicolai's user avatar
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3 votes

All somatic cells contain the same genome, then how does it knows that it should develop into a specific organ?

The answer to your question is not really know yet and there is whole scientific field dedicated to it: developmental biology. I'll try to explain the basics however: Like you described the identity ...
Nicolai's user avatar
  • 4,391
2 votes

Why is the liver the only internal organ of the human body to regrow?

It helps to think about why it's beneficial for an organ/tissue to regenerate. The liver is your main detoxifying organ. It does this by chemically modifying external (and internal) molecules to ...
SeanJ's user avatar
  • 577
2 votes
Accepted

A theoretical ethical dilemma

I agree that iPSCs will continue to be developed and will probably be used to make brains at some point in the future. Whilst it's obviously not possible right now, feasibility isn't the issue here. A ...
Robert Gregson's user avatar
2 votes

Why is xylem a tissue and not an organ?

In plants, there are three types of tissue: meristematic, simple, and complex. Meristematic (embryonic and totipotent) Simple (composed of only one type of cell), such as parenchyma collenchyma ...
Sartoaster11's user avatar
2 votes

Why do we need to close eyes to sleep?

Unlike our underwater ancestors, land animals have evolved eye lids or nictitating membranes to protect our eyes and keep them moist periodically by blinking. During the sleep state, closing our lids ...
Louis Leung's user avatar
2 votes

Organ and Bone Marrow Transplantation?

Bone marrow transplant requires to first destroy the pre-existing immune system with chemotherapy and/or radiations. So essentially you would not have the first immune system and my guess is that yes, ...
Mowgli's user avatar
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2 votes
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Could one hear without his ear?

Short Answer Yes, you could hear, but it would be harder to localize sounds. Longer Answer The "ear" from a biological perspective includes the inner ear which is all of course necessary for ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 46.1k
2 votes
Accepted

Self Grown Organs

Could a viable organ be partially grown in a test tube then be hooked up to the host in some way until it is large enough to swap it with the bad organ? Yes. This conceptual possibility already is a ...
tsttst's user avatar
  • 1,597
2 votes

Animals as organ donors and organ's life expectancy

tl;dr Graft survival, even with allotransplantation (human donor to a human host), is not equal to an average human lifespan. It's much shorter (11-16 years on average). Porcine grafts (which often ...
De Novo's user avatar
  • 8,811
2 votes

Transplant rejection through direct allogenic antigen detection: where do the T cells come from?

Janeway's does not seem to explicitely answer your question: A. "T cells that cannot recognize the body's own MHC molecules (...) this process of positive selection (...)" B. "...
Peter Bernhard's user avatar
1 vote

Why is scaffolding necessary in organ printing?

You can't extract the print a heart "code" from DNA, that's not how DNA or development works. Each organ develops according to a pattern influenced by all the other surrounding tissues. It's ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 46.1k
1 vote

Name/term for mechanisms by wich the relative size/number of cells of some tissue/organ are preserved

You are referring to organ “scaling” and “allometry”.
J--'s user avatar
  • 428
1 vote

Name/term for mechanisms by wich the relative size/number of cells of some tissue/organ are preserved

'Eutely' is the term used for organisms with a fixed number of somatic cells. I'm not aware of any term for sub-organismic structures.
Quercus Montana's user avatar
1 vote

Why Is The Toughness Of Skin Different On Different Parts Of The Body?

There are different receptors and different forces at play here. Skin thickness depends primarily on frictional forces and is determined by the thickness of the epidermis, which is made up of 5 layers ...
Beautymedi's user avatar
1 vote

How does the bladder transition from releasing urine at night to being able to hold urine at night?

The bladder is controlled by both the autonomic and somatic nervous systems. This means that part of the bladder activity is voluntary and another part is involuntary - more precisely, the detrusor (...
Don_S's user avatar
  • 484
1 vote
Accepted

What technique biologists use in order to determine the function of organs?

A very common way of getting information on the function of an organ, part of an organ (such as a region of the brain) or a protein is to look at the outcome (symptoms or phenotype) in cases where it ...
Joce's user avatar
  • 1,127

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