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It looks a lot like a African sacred ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus) (wikilink). However, given your location in India, the closely related Black-headed ibis (which some consider to be part of the same species) might be more likely. The African sacred ibis is native to mainly sub-saharan Africa, but is considered Invasive in some parts of the world (inkl. ...


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"We" don't, always. In addition to the factors in other answers, there's a simple matter of size and inertia at work. If you look at small mammals like squirrels or mice (and presumably small monkeys, though I've never observed one for any length of time), you'll notice that ALL their movements seem to be quick and "jerky", because their heads and other ...


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http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/woodpecker/woodpecker.html Hopefully this should answer your doubts, it both debunks the "impossibility" of such evolutionary pattern and explains how it happened. The unusual appearance of the woodpecker’s "tongue skeleton" has inspired creationists to use it as an example of a structure too bizarre to have evolved ...


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As i understand it: Birds can't move their eyes around the way we can (excepting cormorants and maybe some others), and the result is that they don't have stereoscopic vision when they don't move their heads. More than that, their field of focus is very small if their heads are kept still. That last is also true for us. The chickens we raised have their ...


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