7

The endometrium changes throughout the menstrual cycle in response to hormones. During the first part of the cycle, the hormone estrogen is made by the ovaries. Estrogen causes the lining to grow and thicken to prepare the uterus for pregnancy. In the middle of the cycle, an egg is released from one of the ovaries (ovulation). Following ovulation, levels of ...


4

Nope, not true. It's a pretty common myth; that paper cites a reference from 1932 in primates claiming to show that the ovaries alternate. A few papers before this, in particular this one from 1991 showed that ovulation was not alternating, but this was the first to do so in actually fertile woman. In particular, Alternate ovulation occurred in 61 of ...


3

Ovulation and menstruation don’t happen in normally cycling women at the same time. A basic outline of the hormonal cycle that triggers these events will make this clear. Proliferative (a.k.a follicular*) phase Beginning after menses (when the endometrium is thinned), the hypothalamus produces GnRH which stimulates the anterior pituitary to produce LH and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible