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2

From the first principles: The most sensitive to alcohol part of the human body is it's nervous system. Worms have much simpler (in both biochemistry and organization) nervous system, so they will probably suffer less from a generic poison that the alcohol is. OTOH, you can easily find a substance that is WAY more toxic to the worms than to yourself. Up to ...


4

Although the previous answers give a resounding "No" for the case of human hosts and parasitic worms, a 2012 research paper (Alcohol Consumption As Self-Medication Against Blood-Borne Parasites In The Fruitfly) states that the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) actively seek out foods containing ethanol when they are infected by the eggs/larvae ...


1

The answer to your question depends on the kind of parasites you're focusing on. Looking at bacteria and gastro-intestinal infections, I found three articles (one based on a model stomach, a second one based on a questionnaire and serum analysis and a third one describing a specific incident), which indicate that there is a certain protective effect of ...


5

If you choose your liquor right. The main flavoring of absinthe is wormwood, so named because of its usefulness as a medicine against intestinal worms. The Absinthe-Minded Professor A hundred years later, it seems remarkable that any cocktail could be so celebrated and denigrated. Besides anise, absinthe’s essential ingredient is Artemisia ...


37

1) The evidence from studies does not support the idea that alcohol consumption helps in treating parasites. Alcoholism and Strongyloides stercoralis: Daily Ethanol Ingestion Has a Positive Correlation with the Frequency of Strongyloides Larvae in the Stools (PLoS, 2010): The frequency of Strongyloides was significantly higher in alcoholic patients ...


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