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To add to the good answer by @AliceD, take a look at some tuning curves for hair cells, the sound receptors in the cochlea (these happen to be fairly low frequencies and a turtle cochlea, though those details aren't all that important): Fettiplace, R. (1987). Electrical tuning of hair cells in the inner ear. Trends in Neurosciences, 10(10), 421-425. The ...


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Short answer No, there are no between-hair cell induced tonotopical gaps in frequency perception. Background Young people are able to hear over a frequency range of about 10 octaves, with a frequency resolution of about 0.3% of an octave. So we would have about 2300 resolvable frequencies. This number is dependent on the sound level, as excitation spreads ...


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Short answer Our ears are most sensitive to the mid-frequencies. Background There are different ways of assessing sound level. The physical one simply determines the physical sound pressure level (SPL) in which all the frequencies weigh equally. This is referred to as C-weighting and is expressed in dB SPL. Our ears, however, are most sensitive to ...


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Short answer In a way, yes. Background One prime example where the sense of touch is diminished is when peripheral sensory neurons degenerate, which is called sensory neuropathy. Diabetes is currently a common cause of this disorder, resulting from the high blood glucose levels that damages the small blood vessels which supply the nerves. This prevents ...


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I would classify the neurological phenomenon of "taste" or "tastyness" as an emergent property (1), and therefore synergistic (i.e. not adequately explained simply by additive effects). For example, when something "tastes like chicken" that's a synergistic sensory pattern in your brain involving the specific ratios of the 5 basic tastes(2) on your tongue, ...


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The human brain white balances, the eyes do not, but the process is not instantaneous. the easiest way to see this is to make a person wear colored lenses they will soon see colors normally again, but will need to readjust, taking a similar length of time, once the glasses are removed. Your eyes will balance an image back to white , but it takes time, ...


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