Skip to main content
11 votes
Accepted

Origin of the biochemical term, Pi (inorganic phosphate)

This terminology is at least as old as September 1944 when Enzymatic Synthesis of Acetyl Phosphate Journal of Biological Chemistry 155, 55-70 was published by Lipmann, which says: Inorganic ...
DavePhD's user avatar
  • 756
5 votes
Accepted

Structure of phosphates in nucleotides

Well it turns out that when nucleotides are bonded together in a strand of DNA/RNA (nucleic acid) they ALWAYS HAVE only one phosphate group attached to their nucleoside (nucleoside = sugar + ...
Alex P's user avatar
  • 864
4 votes

Why are plants unable to take up Phosphorus directly in their organic form like Phytic Acid?

I am not a plant biochemist but would make a couple of points that may or may not be relevant or helpful. The living organisms that preceded plants had evolved a wide repertoire of systems for ...
David's user avatar
  • 25.9k
3 votes
Accepted

Are DNA molecules negatively charged at low pH values?

You are right. At a ph<5 which is where the PI of DNA breaks down, the phosphate group will bind protons, while the nitrogenous bases will become positively charged owing to the acidic environment.
Shivansh Kanojia's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Can emulsion test be used to detect phospholipids?

Yes, the test will still work. And you are correct about the phospholipid's process of forming 'circles' in water. The reason the test still works is because alcohol increases the permeability of the ...
Reece's user avatar
  • 213
2 votes

Techniques for detecting phosphorylation sites in proteins?

X-ray crystallography has been used to detect phosphorylated sites. The RCSB protein database currently contains 856 structures that have both a resolution below 3 angstroms and the keyword "...
Michael_A's user avatar
  • 1,305
2 votes
Accepted

Techniques for detecting phosphorylation sites in proteins?

In principle X-ray crystallography or NMR could detect phosphorylation sites but they are much more complex and expensive techniques than mass spec. So for simply figuring out phosphorylation patterns ...
Thawn's user avatar
  • 1,239
2 votes
Accepted

Chemistry of the phosphodiester bond in RNA

Generally hydrogen is not shown in DNA structure. I have made a simple diagram to show where all hydrogens go: There are 3 hydrogens in phosphoric acid, each of them leaves as: 1 H joins with 3' -OH ...
another 'Homo sapien''s user avatar
1 vote

How does the position of hydroxyl group in a nucleotide monomer affect the dehydration synthesis of nucleotides?

Wherever the hydroxyl group is; the result is the same I think. The phosphate has oxygen arranged in a tetrahedron around it. In cells the hydrogen is not attached most of the time. For example the ...
Polypipe Wrangler's user avatar
1 vote

How many phosphates are in the 5' end of a DNA strand?

The DNA polymerase can only extend a primer and therefore almost all lifeforms have a primase (which is a type of RNA polymerase) that synthesizes RNA primers at the replication origins that the DNA ...
WYSIWYG's user avatar
  • 35.6k
1 vote

Glycolysis - ATP production

Though David has already answered as I wished to write one for this question here's my answer$-$ You say that In glycolysis, 2 ATP molecules are produced from each triose phosphate molecule ... I ...
Tyto alba's user avatar
  • 8,782
1 vote

Glycolysis - ATP production

The other two phosphates come from inorganic phosphate* in solution (Pi — in my diagram below) at the glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase stage. (Two, of course, because there are two molecules of ...
David's user avatar
  • 25.9k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible