5

Have you considered that it might be algae? (I think it is.) There are many kinds of algae. I couldn't tell you which one yours is. Algae Under Microscope


5

Almost certainly it is a filament of Spirogyra sp. Cell at center outlined. Thick black line indicates chloroplast. Dotted black line is portion of chloroplasts shielded (hidden) by some other portion of chloroplasts. Chloroplasts are helical (spring-like). Some of the pyrenoids (nearmost to eye, not shielded) marked with blue ring. Other pyrenoids not ...


4

Looks like a Tremella fuciformis, which is actually a sort of yeast that produces jelly-like fruiting bodies. AKA the white jelly mushroom.


1

Because both of those produce single-cells able to viably survive and grow on your own. For example, take a fungal spore and it can grow into a full fungus given enough food. I assume algae cells are the same way. In a single-cell form, fungi and algae qualify as self-sufficient microbes. Animal cells are typically specialized and dependent on a support ...


1

Before explaining it, you need to know 2 things. Fact 1: a cell of an Eukaryotic organism; such as a higher-plant, an animal, or a fungus, is actually not a single cell, but mixture of cells from different distant taxa. taxon-1. The main, host cell (probably came from an archaebacteria (archaea) ), whose 'own' genetic material is in its nucleus. taxon-2. ...


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