3

It comes down to the distinction between velocity and flow rate. While you are right that the water would leave a an increased velocity if you put your thumb over the end of the hose, this is deceptive, because the water is exiting the closed system, so it can go absolutely anywhere. So the fact that the velocity is increased could give one the impression ...


3

A Japanese patent filed by Raymond Jay Bergeron, Jr JP2000514089A notes lysoferrin as the siderophore N1, N4-bis (1-oxo-3-hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxybutyl) diaminobutamate. The US counterpart of this patent, jointly filed as US application No. US08/783,306 and later issued as US 5,739,395 covers rhizoferrin in its embodiments. So it seems that the term lysoferrin ...


1

At a constant volumetric flow-rate, the product of velocity and vesicle cross-section area is constant. In a real-life scenario, the volumetric flow-rate decreases when you hold your finger over the opening. So while water exits 'faster', at higher velocity, you would fill less bottles of water per minute.


1

The key is vascular resistance. Pumps like the heart don't move fluid, they exert force ("push") on it, increasing the pressure. The movement happens subsequently because there is somewhere for the fluid to go, so it moves down the pressure gradient from a place of high pressure to a place of lower pressure. If you clamped their outputs (increased ...


1

This is something I have been researching on and off for many years. I studied nutrition back in the early 1980s and our lecturer always said that "fats burn in the flame of CHOs". He said that the citric acid cycle was dependent on oxaloacetic acid - the predominant source was from glucose (pyruvic acid). https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible