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This is a great question. Without going into too much detail, there is a series of studies done in northeastern US temperate forests (specifically at Great Mountain Forest in Connecticut, USA) on the growth, survival, and dispersal of canopy trees. In this particular community, light appears to be the primary limiting factor. Seedlings and saplings in low-...


6

Only a small fraction of plant carbon is soil-derived: e.g. from Majlesi et al 2019: although the majority of plant C was obtained from atmosphere by photosynthesis, a significant portion (up to 3–5%) of C in plant roots was derived from old soil" (in an experiment with Scots pine and reed canary grass). As laid out by this review of C4 photosynthesis,...


4

According to Evaluation of the Effect of Density on Potato Yield and Tuber Size Distribution potato tuber size was estimated using a normal distribution but they are not normally distributed They found that a Weibull distribution with specific parameters estimated better than a normal distribution. In fact you should not expect a normal distribution because ...


3

The benefit is not in taking up more water but in transporting the things that water contains. Plants rely on bulk transport in water flowing though specialized tissue (xylem), somewhat analogous to blood flow in an animal. Water flows through the xylem using capillary action; when water is lost at the top, capillary action pulls water into the vacated space ...


2

I think you already know the sign convention in calculating the water potential: the addition of solutes lowers the potential (negative vector), while an increase in pressure increases the potential (positive vector).(Another way of saying the same would be more solute = more negative.) {1} This is the same everywhere. Pressure potential: The pressure ...


1

This ref. says that the plastids and mitochondria are still intact. Found by searching for "sieve cell development" Neuberger, D.S., Evert, R.F. Structure and development of sieve cells in the primary phloem ofPinus resinosa . Protoplasma 87, 27–37 (1976). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01623956 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF01623956


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