6

From your own PlosOne link comes proof that the selection pressure was very weak: "Most locations (59%, n = 37) were sampled in only one year, 20 locations in two years, five locations in three years, and one in four years, yielding in total 96 unique location-year combinations of measurements of seasonal total flying insect biomass." "We collected in total ...


6

I'll give here a simple, non-technical answer because I'm assuming you don't need to actually perform an analysis of ancestry. So, detecting ancestry is a non-trivial task. Given your genome sequence, you would need to compare some "informative" regions of the genome with the homologous sequences of some population (say, of a database with other genomes). ...


4

It's not like a strain of E. coli that may cause disease in immunosuppressed individuals yet is a part of normal microbiota for other people. Well, actually, it is kind of like that. The answer is complicated, but can be boiled down to, virulent serotypes of Neisseria meningitidis infect susceptible populations. For the short answer, just read between the ...


3

There are many other lines of evidence over many decades, using many techniques, all showing declines in insect populations. Climate-driven declines in arthropod abundance restructure a rainforest food web Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers Where have all the insects gone? As Insect Populations Decline, Scientists Are Trying to ...


3

[W]hat is the Major allele [frequency]? If the Minor Allele Frequency is $p$, then, for a bi-allelic locus, the major allele frequency is obviously $1-p$. [W]hy reporting the second most frequent allele is helpful? Most polymorphic loci of interest are bi-allelic. Hence, the MAF is an indication of genetic diversity. One could similarly report the ...


2

Expanding on @heracho's answer and Wikipedia, assume pi denotes the probability of having (exactly) i children, and that dm denotes the probability of extinction by the mth generation (note that this includes extinctions by all generations n with n < m). Then dm can be expressed as: $\displaystyle d_m = p_0 + p_1 d_{m-1} + p_2 d_{m-1}^2 + p_3 d_{m-1}^3 + ...


2

I found some averages from 23andme on sciencemag. It doesn't state the figures for all americans, although it says that 8 percent of white americans have some native american ancestry, afro-americans have on average 0.8%, and latino have 18% native american ancestry.


1

Well the obvious answer is of course yes of course it would. That is the essence of natural selection. Variability leads to different phenotypes and selection for and the amplification of beneficial traits. Evolution. Except if there is no selection (everyone has the same amount of kids) no traits are amplified so everything in a large population is static. ...


1

The binomial variance $2N p (1-p)$ is for the number of individuals $n'$ carrying the allele in the next generation. The frequency of the allele in the next generation is $p'=n'/(2N)$, so its variance is $$\text{Var}[p'] = \text{Var}[n'/(2N)] = \text{Var}[n']/(2N)^2 = p(1-p)/(2N).$$


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