9 votes

Is prion a term used to describe the normal form of the protein as well as the disease causing form?

If we are considering prions in general, I disagree with the answer supplied by Gerardo Furtado. Here is a definition taken from an article by Susan Lindquist: [Prions are]...self-perpetuating ...
Alan Boyd's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

Difference between prions and amyloid proteins?

Amyloids are protease resistant insoluble fibrils formed because of (mis)folding and aggregation of soluble proteins (Rambaran and Serpell, 2008, Sabate et al., 2015). The first definition of prion ...
WYSIWYG's user avatar
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7 votes

Are prions a recent biological phenomenon?

Knock-out experiments on non-pathological prion proteins ("PrP") show damage to neurons. So there is evolutionary pressure to conserve their sequence and expression. Mutations to PrP and related ...
Alex Reynolds's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Why there aren't any pandemic diseases by prions?

I think that you could argue that some prion diseases do form epidemics or outbreaks. In some cases it does appear that people have referred to BSE/vCJD as pandemics. There is even some journalism on ...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
4 votes

How does mad cow disease evade immune system?

Prions are proteins that we produced but that are misfolded and affect the folding of other proteins. As we produce these proteins, we don't recognize them as antigens. If we were to recognize our own ...
Remi.b's user avatar
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4 votes

How do prions cross the blood brain barrier?

I am not sure if a perfect answer is possible owing to the fact that Prion diseases are still incompletely understood, and are actively under research. On a preliminary search, I found some papers ...
stochastic13's user avatar
  • 4,679
4 votes
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Intelligence of nervous system vs other human intelligence?

"Arc" is the Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein. It's one of the "immediate early genes", which are genes whose expression changes very quickly in response to ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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4 votes

Are prions a recent biological phenomenon?

Update: note that prion-like proteins have now been discovered in Archaea. Note that prion proteins are an important component of yeast natural history. If they are shared between yeast, amniotes, and ...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Is it possible for prion-infected meat to be processed safely (such as in Soylent Green) and still provide some form of nutrition?

No. There are two processes that we need to consider. First off: incineration at 1000 C (1832 F) in an oxidizing atmosphere will result in almost total destruction of the material. Carbon based ...
bob1's user avatar
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3 votes
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What's the difference between prions and prion-like proteins?

My understanding is that the principal quality of a prion is that it behaves like a prion in cells- the logic is a little circular. A few of these criteria for acting like a prion (in yeast, where ...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
3 votes

What negative effects does cannabalism have in other species (like prion diseases) and how are they mitigated?

Some of the processes working against cannibalism: conspecifics (especially similar-aged conspecifics) are likely to be able to fight back effectively, increasing the risk of injury to the would-be ...
Ben Bolker's user avatar
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3 votes
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Could the denaturation of protein during cooking could generate a prion, by any chance?

Just my speculation here. Prions seem to need some sort of template to guide their folding as well as the cooperation of chaperone proteins. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prion I would suspect that ...
bpedit's user avatar
  • 1,351
2 votes

Is prion a term used to describe the normal form of the protein as well as the disease causing form?

The Wikipedia definition of prions is quite clear I think: Prions are infectious agents composed entirely of a protein material that can fold in multiple, structurally abstract ways, at least one ...
alec_djinn's user avatar
  • 3,108
2 votes
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What negative effects does cannabalism have in other species (like prion diseases) and how are they mitigated?

First, to be clear, the very act of cannibalism does not cause the development of prions, but the consumption of an animal infected with a compatible form of them, particularly when eating nervous or ...
Harris's user avatar
  • 324
2 votes
Accepted

How do PrP mutations lead to prion disease?

If the amino acid sequence of both proteins is the same, what determines whether the synthesized protein will take the disease-causing tertiary structure or the normal one? PrP-C and PrP-Sc do ...
S Pr's user avatar
  • 6,222
2 votes
Accepted

Why do you get prion diseases from eating animal brains but not other parts of the animal?

The notion that you get prion diseases like BSE only by consumption of brain is not correct. Any part of the infected animal that contains nervous system tissue or lymphatic tissue can be infectious, ...
R Stephan's user avatar
  • 3,840
2 votes

Method to detect Protein aggregation

I started writing a comment but it got out of hand so I'm just doing an answer. There are many many papers that describe methods for detecting aggregation. Below is a semi-random sample. What exactly ...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
1 vote

Is it possible for prion-infected meat to be processed safely (such as in Soylent Green) and still provide some form of nutrition?

Removal of prions in organic material by thermal degradation completely destroys the organic material. However, prions can also be digested by some enzymes, particularly keratinase, under relatively ...
timeskull's user avatar
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1 vote

In terms of Prions is there a possibility, that other proteins apart from PRPC could be misfolded

There are many prions other than PrP; it is often helpful to e.g. read wikipedia for these cases. For example, there are many yeast prions that are not homologous to PrP https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Could a virus produce prions, leading to prion disease?

Perhaps not prions themselves, but viruses may possibly contain "pieces" or domains of proteins with prion-like chemical activity, which can catalyse refolding of prions from normal to disease state. ...
Alex Reynolds's user avatar
1 vote

Are there any proteins not found in the brain that are affected by prions?

Yes, malformed prion proteins can affect tissues outside of the brain. Via: https://www.merckmanuals.com/home/brain,-spinal-cord,-and-nerve-disorders/prion-diseases/overview-of-prion-diseases ...
Alex Reynolds's user avatar
1 vote

How do prions transmit their conformation to other proteins?

It is thought that infectious prions exist as clusters forming a crystalline structure. When a protein with the same primary structure is encountered but with a different tertiary structure, the ...
Graham Chiu's user avatar

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