If you are looking for information on Coronaviruses, we have prepared this FAQ with information on what is on topic on this site and links to some reputable external resources.
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The human body can not store Proteins (technically). BACKGROUND : PROTEIN is a very broad term and there are hundreds and thousands of proteins.[1] Proteins are heteropolymers consisting of amino acids held by peptide bonds. Amino acids : There are 9 amino acids which we need to intake. Phenylalanine, valine, threonine, tryptophan, methionine, leucine,...


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I'm sure HIV is well studied since as you know it has a small genome and is highly relevent to therapeutic research, but virus regulation can be complicated and not representative of what happens in normal cells. This is why model organisms exist. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has about 6,000 genes and researchers have systematically deleted nearly ...


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Enveloped RNA viruses will get inactivated quickly without a membrane. RNase is a ubiquitous enzyme that would quickly digest any exposed genetic material. Via https://www.neb.com/tools-and-resources/usage-guidelines/avoiding-ribonuclease-contamination: RNases are found in all cell types and organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. These enzymes ...


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I'll add a more straightforward answer than the previous answerer (who was certainly more in-depth and informative than I will be), for the purposes of clarity. I think protein is stored in the body very much functionally, just not in reservoirs of reserve chemical energy such as adipose tissues do with fat. I am interested to know if a human body can ...


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