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7

Might as well make this an answer. ...it seems to collapse when I rub my foot on it. As @tyersome stated, it appears to be salt, not mold. Salt crystals would definitely collapse easily underfoot, and should be mostly quite dry, whereas mold would be... maybe squishy (?) but likely unpleasant in some way. Mold also smells, which you haven't mentioned, ...


7

The University of California, LA mentions some genera and species of salt-loving plants (halophytes): The genus Atriplex (Family Chenopodiaceae), saltbush, is found worldwide along saline shorelines. On the surfaces of the leaf are vesiculated trichomes (hairs). Each trichome has a stalk and a balloon-like tip, the bladder cell. The leaves use the bladder ...


6

There are a couple of strategies that salt-tolerant plants can use to survive in high-salt conditions. Plants can increase the concentration of compatible solutes in their cell to the point where the intracellular concentration of solute approaches the concentration of the water in the environment. By doing this, the plants are able to minimize water loss ...


6

This issue was studied in Virus inactivation by salt (NaCl) and phosphate supplemented salt in a 3D collagen matrix model for natural sausage casings International Journal of Food Microbiology Volume 148, Pages 128–134. Saturated NaCl was tested on 4 types of virus, foot-and-mouth-disease virus (FMDV), classical swine fever virus (CSFV), swine vesicular ...


4

Seawater is many times more salty than the "pinch" of salt that is often recommended to add to cooked dishes. According to the USGS the concentration of salt in seawater (salinity) is about 35 parts per thousand. In other words, about 35 of 1,000 (3.5%) of the weight of seawater comes from the dissolved salts To translate that to a typical glass ...


4

The article you reference is only referring to supplemental use of salt; many foods are naturally salty, and I don't see any evidence there that Yanomamo are actually low on salt, merely that they have adapted to a lower sodium diet. The authors are simply making a case that the contemporary diet is very high in salt. When animals move water around their ...


4

Perception of saltiness is because of the sodium ion. At concentrations ≤ 100mM, sodium ions elicit a taste response pathway which is inhibited by a small molecule called amiloride. Other monovalent cations do not elicit this "amiloride-sensitive" response. At higher concentrations sodium ions elicit a non-amiloride sensitive response; other ions like K+ ...


4

The notion that tea and coffee are diuretic and don't count in your daily waterbalance, is an urban myth. At most, both are mildly diuretic (if any). The assumption is based from an old study from 1928 with only three participants. While the small number of participants alone is a good reason to reject the study (it would never get published today) because ...


3

This paper might be of interest to you: https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/8/eaax5253. The researchers created a synthetic mangrove that actually performs desalination, using the principles of natural mangroves. The introduction has a good overview of the main ways mangroves desalinate saline water, namely: Physical blockage by suberin within cells ...


3

There has been a lot of research in this field which asserts that mangroves desalinate sea water. Scholander (1968) concludes that this process in mangroves use an ultrafiltration mechanism in the roots of the plant where membranes extract freshwater which is taken up the plant. Scholander, P.F., 1968. How mangroves desalinate seawater. Physiologia ...


3

According to Wikipedia the Crab-eating frog is the only amphibian that can survive in sea water. However Wikipedia also suggests that it can only survive brief excursions into the sea. There are no such things as sea frogs. Even the Crab-eating frog doesn't live in the sea though. Its natural habitat is mangrove swamps. The crab-eating frog (Fejervarya ...


3

Many biological processes require regulation of the salts (or more precisely ions) in fluid compartments of an organism. These processes include muscle contraction, filtration of the blood by the kidneys, and so on. Without these processes, a fish would certainly be dead. So it's not necessarily that regulating ions aids evolution or metabolism, nor that the ...


3

Hunter-gatherers rarely if ever added salt to their foods, and studies of salt-free Yanomamo Indians have shown these indigenous people to maintain low blood pressures that do not increase with aging (Oliver et al, 1975). --The paradoxical nature of hunter-gatherer diets: meat-based, yet non-atherogenic. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2002) 56, ...


2

I'm not sure that we take it for granted that marine organisms are substantially less salty than seawater. As to my knowledge, elasmobranchii, e.g., sharks, and echinoderms, e.g., sea urchins, have osmolarities that are quite near seawater (~1000 mOsm). I expect a careful investigation would show many other kinds of marine organisms are similar.


1

INTRODUCTION: The basic process by which opening of stomata takes place is by endosmosis.Endosmosis causes an increase in turgidity in the guard cells thereby causing its opening. The closing of stomata is achieved by exosmosis which makes the guard cells flaccid. HOW DO THE REGULATION TAKES PLACE IN PLANTS: If you read the theory proposed by Levitt from ...


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