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8 votes

Does sex-chromosomes exist in all the cells in a human body?

Like the other answer already said: yes, all cells in the human body contain all 2x 23 chromosomes (with the exception of cells that loose all nuclear DNA during maturation, like red blood cells, or ...
Nicolai's user avatar
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7 votes
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Why is Turner syndrome a problem?

Short answer Some genes on the X chromosome escape X-inactivation. Two copies of these genes are needed for normal development. These genes are also present on the Y chromosome. Hence, healthy males ...
AliceD's user avatar
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6 votes
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When was it discovered XY chromosomes decide the sex of a child in humans?

The discovery of genetic sex determination, and determination of sex via male gametes (in XY species, female in ZW), occurred over some time in the late 1800's and early 1900's. Advances were made ...
rg255's user avatar
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6 votes
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Can a Turner syndrome patient develop male characteristics artificially?

After a lot of research, I've finally found an answer. In the case of humans, it is practically impossible. See this article from wikipedia: During gestation, the cells of the primordial gonad ...
another 'Homo sapien''s user avatar
6 votes

Why is there Turner syndrome if one of the X chrosomes is inactivated anyway?

Pseudoautosomal region in mammals On sexual chromosomes, we have a so-called PseudoAutosomal Region (PAR). The PAR is the region which still recombine with the Y chromosome (in males only) and is ...
Remi.b's user avatar
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5 votes

What is the X-chromosome responsible for?

Here is the list! There are about 900 protein coding genes and about 500 non-coding transcribed sequences. It is not going to be feasible to explain you the function of every single one of those genes....
Remi.b's user avatar
  • 68.1k
4 votes

Why is Turner syndrome a problem?

@AliceD's answer is excellent, but I thought it would be helpful to include an additional perspective. The issue here isn't that monosomy X shouldn't be a problem because the majority of one X ...
De Novo's user avatar
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4 votes
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Are color-blind carriers partially colorblind?

Looking at the literature, I find the following passage in a review of the genetics of colorblindness: Females have two X-chromosomes, and can either be homozygous or heterozygous for the X-...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
4 votes

How is cognitive ability linked to the presence of sex chromosomes?

If you are thinking that, say, a chromosome 1 triploidy will not result in cognitive impairment... that's not quite right. Almost all triploidies result in death. Same with chr2, chr3, chr4...just ...
swbarnes2's user avatar
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4 votes
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Why are X-linked illnesses less common in females if females have X-chromosome inactivation anyway?

Barr bodies (X-chromosome inactivation) don't form in the initial fertilized embryo — it's not that one X-chromosome is inactivated, and then that same inactivation is passed down to daughter cells. ...
Asher F.'s user avatar
  • 197
2 votes

Sex linked genes?

It is not easy for an individual to figure out if it is haploid or diploid at a given sequence. To my knowledge, this is feasible only by searching for specific case of heterozygosity. The most ...
Remi.b's user avatar
  • 68.1k
2 votes

Why does the cloned cat, CC, exhibit mosaic fur color?

There are mechanisms through which the X-chromosome that has been turned into a Barr-body can be re-activated. This happens during cloning, but is also seen in some cells that turn into cancer cells. ...
Yuri Robbers's user avatar
2 votes

Does sex-chromosomes exist in all the cells in a human body?

All cells except mature rbcs contain genetic material. So every cell must contain 46 chromosome containing sex chromosome as well
Sam's user avatar
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2 votes
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How is cognitive ability linked to the presence of sex chromosomes?

Cognitive impairment does not have to do anything in particular with the sex chromosomes. Downs syndrome results because of trisomy of an autosome and it also results in cognitive impairment. So, ...
WYSIWYG's user avatar
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2 votes
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Does the 1:1 sex ratio at birth apply to every human pregnancy or is it a statistical average?

The ratio you are referring to is indeed computed aggregating multiple observations and thus it is a "statistical average". Any individual (or couple, in this case) can have a specific ratio that ...
alec_djinn's user avatar
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1 vote

Why are odd numbers of chromosomes (triploidy, pentaploidy) less common than even ones (tetraploidy, hexaploidy)?

Sexual reproduction means taking chromosomes from two parents. Most commonly, that means that each parent gives just half their chromosomes to their gametes, such that the offspring will have a full ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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1 vote
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How does X chromosome monosomy occur

Most often, it seems that Turner syndrome is due to fertilization by a sperm cell lacking a sex chromosome. I wouldn't describe such a cell as "empty": it still has the other 22 chromosomes, but in ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 46k
1 vote

Large study showing that attraction to only the same sex has to do with your genes, published where?

Possibly https://science.sciencemag.org/content/365/6456/eaat7693.long is what you were looking for? It implicates a few specific genes - the connection to olfaction is interesting (I would suggest ...
Mike Serfas's user avatar
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1 vote
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How do the chromosomes arrange themselves after fertilization in humans?

After fertilization the diploid cells divide by mitosis. Chromosomes don’t need to pair with their partner during the eukaryotic cell cycle. After S-phase each chromosome has been duplicated (so ...
mdperry's user avatar
  • 3,517
1 vote

Meiosis pairing of chromosomes

There is 'homology' at the pseudo-autosomal region, a recombining region of the X and Y chromosomes.
Remi.b's user avatar
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