Hot answers tagged

21

The mice aren't invading Australia, they are invading the wheat producing zones, where the tractors are leveling the land and putting on pesticides. The local frog, amphibian and snake populations downstream of the farmer's fields is strongly affected by the farmland, and so are the birds of prey, if they weather the pesticide use, they have to hide in dense ...


15

Ashok's Bronzeback (Dendrelaphis ashoki). This is a relatively small snake (typically 70 cm in length) that feeds on lizards, frogs and small rodents. More information can be found here or here. It's range is Southwestern India: You can differentiate this species from closely related D. girii based on it having a longer "postocular" black line than D. ...


8

It's difficult because the image quality is low, but there are some key features that can be made out which suggest it to be a Western Coachwhip, or "Whip snake", Masticophis flagellum testaceus. There is not a huge number of species in New Mexico, and most have quite clearly different patterns and coloration, which brings it down to just a couple of ...


7

Looks very much like a red rat snake (Pantherophis guttatus). Nonvenomous, and wonderful.


6

Definitely looks like some species of rat snake (genus Pantherophis). Based on the size, location and coloration, I'd say it's a dark variant of a Gray rat snake (Pantherophis spiloides). It might also be a cross between a black and grey rat snake (i.e., Pantherophis spiloides x obsoletus). Source: Todd Pierson Sources: Alan Brumbeloe | Bill ...


5

Hard to tell without a clearer picture, but the size and color pattern seem to match the description for the Plain-bellied Watersnake. See for example the following picture from the Virginia Herpetological Society: I assume from the location being in something called a swamp that the habitat (in and near slow moving bodies of water) also fits.


5

Great find! I'm pretty certain that is actually a Prairie Kingsnake (Lampropeltis calligaster - likely the subspecies L. c. calligaster). The biggest indicator to me are the two alternating rows of dark spots on sides, with some blotches fusing. They are distributed all over Missouri, although pretty rarely seen due to their microhabitat: They tend to be ...


5

It's hard to answer your question directly. But one might start by noting that pythons are hardly alone - snakes in general have evolved the ability to swallow prey that is much larger than themselves. It's probably not unusual for opportunistic carnivores to stumble across gorged snakes and make a meal out of them. But there's a flip side: Consider an ...


5

An excellent question. This fun mental floss article addresses that question, but from the perspective of one snake biting another snake: Snake on snake violence “The conventional wisdom is that they have circulating antibodies in their blood,” says Stephen Mackessy, Ph.D., a Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Northern Colorado and an ...


4

Short explanation According to the papers I could find, Dendrelaphis ashoki and D. girii aren't as closely related as you suggest: D. ashoki appears to be closely related to D. pictus, a Southeast Asian snake species, while D. girii appears to be closely related to D. bifrenalis, a Sri Lankan/South Indian snake species. They were distinguished from their ...


4

Could be a Temple Viper (Tropidolaemus wagleri). Hard to tell from the picture, but the head looks spaded like a Temple Viper's and I think they come in the green morph you show


4

This Times of India article mentions the name "peevna" in relation to the "saw-scaled viper". According to Wikipedia, the genus Echis contains 12 species that are commonly referred to as a group as "saw-scaled vipers." Of these, one clearly is found in India: Echis_carinatus (commonly called the "saw-scaled viper", &...


3

I believe this is a Barred Grass Snake, Natrix helvetica. There are only a few snakes naturally found in the UK, and the Grass Snake matches the size, color, and pattern (bars on the sides but not on the back). The "N. helvetica" designation is relatively new, 2017, following genetic testing that showed that the previous name of Natrix natrix was not correct....


3

Though a full body image would help a lot, I feel certain that it is the desert king snake scientifically known as Lampropeltis getula splendida. This species is seen in most parts of New Mexico and is not venomous. It primarily feeds on rodents, lizards, birds, snakes and eggs. Here's a link to a website with more details on this species and other snake ...


3

My answer's coming late but thought it's worth checking out the comment made by Anutapa bhattaharya that it was a wolf snake. I realise he only said it with no references or photos but still, since his name strongly suggests he's from Sri Lanka, I thought I'd see. I believe he's correct and the snake in the photo is an Indian wolf snake (Lycodon aulicus), a ...


3

Just to add another option: My guess (though no more confident than @p.s.w.g's answer) is Balanophis ceylonensis (Sri Lankan Keelback) or related species. The two features that stand out to me from your photo are the dotted markings on the back of the snake, and the dark line running behind the snake's eye. You'll notice the keelback in this picture ...


3

I'm not an expert by any means, and anyone with proper training could probably provide a more informed opinion, but here's my thoughts. The patterning looks similar to Oligodon taeniolatus, an small, nonvenomous snake found throughout the region: I'm not entirely sure about this identification, mostly because the pattern on the head looks a bit different. ...


3

Constrictors doesn't have uniform body circumference from head to tail. They coil around the prey accordingly. In your example, if the prey is very small, it just swallows. If its little big, it coils a little bit (check some videos like this) say two turn coil. This will only cover top half feet of constrictor's length which is of lesser diameter than the ...


3

It looks like a whip snake, either a Balkan whip snake or a green whip snake. They are both present in the very north of Italy, close to Slovenia. They both vary in color, but the coloration of this one seems to be more similar to the Balkan whip snake. See also this discussion.


2

Aesculapian snake (Zamenis longissimus). Common european species, non venomous, rodent/egg eater. edit1: they can swim and can be found next to water bodies but are terrestrial.


2

This is Orthriophis taeniurus ridleyi, a synonym is Elaphe taeniura. It has a few common names,some are Ridley's beauty snake,Cave beauty and Cave racer. https://www.biolib.cz/en/taxon/id310150/ https://www.naturepl.com/search?s=orthriophis+taeniurus+ridleyi2581 https://www.zootierliste.de/en/?klasse=3&ordnung=305&familie=30513&art=21102660 ...


2

It looks like a Balkan Whip Snake (Hierophis gemonensis (syn. Coluber gemonensis)): More images: Reptiles of Crete Reptile Database Balcanica.info Wikipedia image According to iNaturalist.org: The Balkan whip snake is a slender snake with smooth scales usually under a metre (yard) long but exceptionally reaching 130 cm (50 ins). The head is fairly ...


2

You're right, snakes rely on scent to capture their prey. The fact that snakes are carnivores may be the one constant among all snake species; absolutely none feed even partially on plant matter. So if plant matter is found in their feces, it must have gotten there accidentally. Here, check out this post, which answers your question perfectly: In most ...


2

It is the venomous Common Krait (Bungarus caeruleus), one of the Big Four Indian Snakes, responsible for the highest number of snake bites in India.


2

Almost certainly the Western Rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis, which is probably the most common rattlesnake in California. It has the characteristic fat body and stripes of a Rattlesnake. Western rattlesnakes are very common in much of the western part of the USA from southern Canada south into Mexico and across the Great Plains. See second link for photos ...


1

I presume it can only spit once or twice only An unwise presumption. These cobras exhibited distinct control of venom flow with spits averaging 1.7% of the volume of the venom gland, thus enabling the cobras to rapidly expel over 40 consecutive spits ... There was no significant difference in the amount of venom spat between the first few spits and the ...


1

I finally got frustrated enough to dig up A Revision of the Liasis childreni species-group (Serpentes: Boidae) L.A. Smith, 1985 - the original paper that split up this species complex, and when even Smith made primary determinations off of pattern and color alone, I took matters into my own hands and dug into the his raw data. I have compiled the mean ...


1

This is a misbelief and the possible answer is the "Krait" and its subspecies. Here is a blog post by a scientist in the Tata institute of fundamental research. The blog contains data compiled from various sources for the "Special Interest Group-Snakes newsletter, I.I.T. Bombay". As per the blog post "In northwestern India, kraits ...


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