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8 votes
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What do you call clearly different sub-groups within a species?

In eusocial insects, especially ants and bees, these groups are called "castes" (see e.g. Hölldobler & Wilson, 1990. This is the same term that is used for social stratifications in some human ...
fileunderwater's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Would it be possible to create logical circuits out of insects?

In short, yes, it appears to be possible, and a number of people have performed investigations in this area. For example, see the "Ant-Based Computing" article suggested by @Roland, whose ...
jakebeal's user avatar
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5 votes
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How selective are wolves about the size of their prey?

You should not post here until you've demonstrated your own research effort. Given this stipulation -- and the rich literature about this very topic -- I will keep my answer cursory so as to act as ...
theforestecologist's user avatar
5 votes

Why social animals attack odd members of their own group?

Persecution is not a term often used in zoology, compared for example to the notion of social exclusion and hierarchy disputes/social animal hierarchy. That is because humans incarcerate animals which ...
bandybabboon's user avatar
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4 votes
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Frogs stop croaking at same time

Calling is a risky activity because it makes the frog conspicuous to predators. When calling in a group, the risk to any given individual is minimized to the point that the minimal risk is outweighed ...
et is's user avatar
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4 votes

Male Parenting from Evolution point

Because mother invest the most material and time into producing the offspring, so there is a stronger pressure on them to not waste it. Males can go impregnate other females so there is a stronger ...
John's user avatar
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4 votes

The evolutionary advantage of sending the most fearless to the front

Species evolve, but individuals are selected. Simplifying a bit, a species evolves as relative allele frequencies change in the population. When natural selection is at play, these changes in allele ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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3 votes

Do microorganisms have complex social behaviors like dominance hierarchies, just as "higher animals" do?

Short answer All of these papers describe competition; that's all they share in common. Competition is ubiquitous in nature; it need not even involve organisms that have ever encountered each other: ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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3 votes
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Why do ants dig surface paths?

I don't have it with me, but the book Adventures among Ants by Mark Moffett, which I highly recommend if you're even vaguely interested in ants, describes the creation of paths such as this. Some ants ...
Oosaka's user avatar
  • 3,253
3 votes

Intuitive explanation for Kin- and Group- selection

Are kin selection and group selection the same thing? Yes and no. Yes: These days people tend to use the "direct fitness approach" (Taylor and Frank JTB 1996). It turns out that this is based on ...
Charles Goodnight's user avatar
3 votes

Are there mammalian species in which the male makes no contribution after coitus?

Narrowly speaking, the answer to your question is "yes, most of them". West and Capellini (2016) analyze a data set comprising 529 mammalian species, of which only 65 have any form of male ...
Ben Bolker's user avatar
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2 votes

Does Japan have an ageing population?

I hate to sound rude, but you could easily answer this yourself with even the most minimal look into well-tabulated demographic information, rather than highly non-representative observations. About ...
Raghu Parthasarathy's user avatar
2 votes

Can someone explain this phenomena?

Parakeets are social animals that live in large groups (flocks). Under ideal environmental conditions, they can form flocks composed of thousands of birds. http://www.softschools.com/facts/animals/...
Retardi Grade's user avatar
2 votes

Factors That Would Promote Eusocial Development In Mammals?

What? Eusociality in mammals can be defined by the following criteria: reproductive altruism (which involves reproductive division of labor and cooperative alloparental brood care); overlap of adult ...
AliceD's user avatar
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2 votes
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What is the function of smelly sweat in primates?

It's a tricky query to answer, so here's some prelim info and someone can be more specific from there: Apocrine glands are a type of sweat gland found in certain mammals, including humans. These ...
bandybabboon's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Are there any eusocial swarms which act prosocially?

Argentine ants. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argentine_ant Global "mega-colony": The absence of aggression within Argentine ant colonies was first reported in 1913 by Newell & Barber,...
Willk's user avatar
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1 vote

What sort of social structure might *Homo floresiensis* have had?

Almost universally, there is little evidence for the social structures of early hominids. Such things simply do not survive in the fossil record. You may be able to glean some idea of homo ...
Rich's user avatar
  • 326
1 vote

What is the function of smelly sweat in primates?

To elaborate slightly on the existing answer in which mention is made of 'genetic compatibility', there are many compelling studies which indicate a strong preference for dissimilarity in class 1 HLA ...
jeremiah's user avatar
  • 307
1 vote
Accepted

Do animals lie?

This question has been well studied by cognitive scientists who are interested in which aspects of complex human behavior are also exhibited by animals. The only real problem here is that the word &...
jakebeal's user avatar
  • 7,007
1 vote

Did mammals evolve from something with eusociality?

No. The only truly eusocial mammals are Heterocephalus glaber (the naked mole-rat) and Fukomys damarensis (the damaraland blesmol). Eusociality doesn't just involve an individual sacrificing their ...
user2352714's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

What's the technical terminology for call-and-respond type behaviour?

if you are referring to call and response in rapid succession, ethologist use the terminology "turn-taking" or "antiphonal calling". Many species do it with different degrees of precision. A rapid ...
have fun's user avatar
  • 1,375
1 vote
Accepted

When is an ant colony at its loudest?

I believe you speak of some species of Formica spp., such as Formica polyctena (nest example) You should mind that (i) ants are not particularly noisy insects; (ii) ant nests are 3-dimensional ...
Scientist's user avatar
  • 318
1 vote

How to mark an ant with the least disturbance to the ant and the nest

For this purpose, people usually paint ants on top of the thorax (not on the head where it can prevent eyes and antenna to function normally, nor on the abdomen where it can block the spiracles and ...
Nakx's user avatar
  • 375
1 vote

How do polygyne Carebara affinis or C. diversus (a.k.a. Pheidologeton affinis and P. diversus) colonies work?

I don't know about their polygyne nature, but carebara diversa queens are between 20-25mm and carebara affinis queens are between 14-16mm and are slightly lighter in colour. Hopefully that should help ...
Alex's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
Accepted

Are there any animals that celebrate communally?

An event causes us to perform some sort of celebration that is motivated simply by joy and not any sort of survival instinct. Celebrations usually mean large group activity but a play can be ...
dmishra's user avatar
  • 214
1 vote

Why do ants dig surface paths?

Are there trees ? The only thing this seems to stop is leave litter and small grains from blocking the path when there is a slight breeze. They build other structures for rain and seem to build less ...
william krummeck's user avatar

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