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20 votes

When does a virus become a different species?

The general issue of what exactly a "species" is has been addressed numerous times here, in different forms. Some good answers can be found at: Defining "species" (Are species an ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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9 votes

Defining "species" (Are species an emergent property or an ensemble of quantitative differences?)

Can we give a robust definition of species? No. Species constantly evolve, diverge, converge, interbreed, and mix and shuffle and trade and spread genes. To draw a box at any particular point in ...
S Pr's user avatar
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8 votes
Accepted

Are there any half-evolved animals alive today?

I know that there are animals that are "simpler" than other animals but are there any that are half-evolved? Why aren't there living half ape and half humans? Oh come on. You know if ...
Oosaka's user avatar
  • 3,253
7 votes

Are all hybrids infertile?

Species definition The whole problem is based upon your definition of hybrid and therefore your definition of species. If a hybrid is the offspring of two individuals belonging to different species ...
Remi.b's user avatar
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5 votes

How has the theory of evolution changed over time?

How has the theory of evolution changed over time? It improved quite a bit. To put things in perspective; today most of evolutionary biology is about evolutionary genetics while at Darwin time (On ...
Remi.b's user avatar
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4 votes
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Can some human groups evolve into new species?

Absolutely it is possible for the current human species to evolve in to two distinct species in the future. Barriers to reproduction, such as physical isolation, help the process along as it allows ...
rg255's user avatar
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4 votes

Can Eskimos be regarded a distinct species from Kalahari Bushmen based on morphological differences & geographic isolation?

I think that species delimitation is not a science, or at least not a coherent one. Different fields use different criteria, for practical or historical reasons. For instance, in plants, loads of ...
bli's user avatar
  • 2,195
4 votes

How to produce correct epithet of a species named in the honor of a person?

You should check the article 60 of ICN: http://www.iapt-taxon.org/nomen/main.php?page=art60 See in particular Recommendation 60C about specific epithet, and in the specific case, the rule 60C.1 (...
Giacomo Catenazzi's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Is there any artificial species (in particular, an artificial species of animal)?

Artificial selection leading to new species - Domestication As you talk about dogs in your intro, let's consider them. You will fail to breed a great dane and chihuahua for obvious mechanical ...
Remi.b's user avatar
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4 votes

Is it tautological that all living humans descended from a single male and single female human ancestor?

The assertion is not tautological because the definition of speciation does not involve single individuals.1 From Wikipedia: Speciation is the evolutionary process by which populations evolve to ...
Darlingtonia's user avatar
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4 votes

Are genetic crosses between asexual organisms possible?

When it comes to viruses and bacteria, genetic cross is just as a vaguely defined concept as species. The latter is often defined on the percentage of the sequence similarity (for viruses) or the ...
Roger V.'s user avatar
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3 votes

How extensive was interbreeding among human species?

Interbreeding between H. sapiens and neandertalis was quite limited. Our results indicate that the amount of Neanderthal DNA in living non-Africans can be explained with maximum probability by ...
iayork's user avatar
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3 votes

How many generations does it take for one species to become a new one?

Your question is like asking about the color spectrum. A wavelength of 530nm is green; a wavelength of 580nm is yellow. So let's say it takes 60nm of wavelength change to go from green to yellow. What ...
Oosaka's user avatar
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3 votes

Can Eskimos be regarded a distinct species from Kalahari Bushmen based on morphological differences & geographic isolation?

Welcome to the difficult concept called "Species". Let me ask a simple question are tigers and lions different species? They look different (Lion is a solid light brown. Tiger is a darker brown ...
JayCkat's user avatar
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3 votes

What is the difference between a species tree, a gene tree and a phylogenetic tree?

Phylogenetic tree A phylogenetic tree is a tree showing relationship between lineages. These lineages might be computed for genome-wide DNA or from only a single gene. As such the term phylogenetic ...
Remi.b's user avatar
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3 votes
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The split in Boroeutheria into Euarchontoglires and Laurasiatheria. Was this due to the opening up of the Atlantic Ocean?

It would seem the answer is "No" at the current understanding of this issue. You should understand that this is a very complex topic, which is based on both molecular (i.e. DNA sequences or ...
bob1's user avatar
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2 votes

How do similar environments on islands in close proximity result in allopatric speciation?

The question is a bit confusing because it seems to be built on at least 5 misunderstandings. Allopatry and gene flow [..] allopatric speciation seen in the Galapagos finches. Adaptive radiation ...
Remi.b's user avatar
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2 votes
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Speed of evolution

The video is a simplification of the speciation concept in order to convey principles of evolution using Darwin's finches as an example. Very rapid speciation (obvious speciation in 1000 years or ...
user22542's user avatar
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2 votes
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New speciations among Darwin's finches

According to oneZoom.org (see the node of interest here), the large ground finch and the large cactus finch share a common ancestor about 170k years ago. Looking among Darwin finches on oneZoom.org, I ...
Remi.b's user avatar
  • 68.2k
2 votes

speciation in a single population

Allopatric speciation Allopatric speciation [..], also referred to as geographic speciation, vicariant speciation, or its earlier name, the dumbbell model, is a mode of speciation that occurs when ...
Remi.b's user avatar
  • 68.2k
2 votes

How does evolution explain the apparation of different group like: mammals, insects etc

Insects and mammals diverged from one-another over 500 million years ago. For most of Earths 4.5 billion year history, life was single-celled, or organized into colonies of single-celled organisms. ...
Karl Kjer's user avatar
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2 votes
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What problem does the Dobzhansky-Muller Model resolve?

If reproductive isolation was to be caused by a single mutation, then the first individual to carry this mutation would likely have a very low fitness. At the extreme, in a purely sexually reproducing ...
Remi.b's user avatar
  • 68.2k
2 votes

What "most closely related to" means in phylogenetic trees?

Phylogenies are an attempt to answer precisely the question of what things are most similar, where "similar" can mean one of a number of things. In statistical terms, a phylogeny is a ...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

How does evolution explain the apparation of different group like: mammals, insects etc

Re a fly evolving into a rabbit, theoretically yes, practically no. Insects (and invertebrates in general) made some evolutionary "choices" like having an exoskeleton & breathing through trachea ...
jamesqf's user avatar
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1 vote

How does evolution explain the apparation of different group like: mammals, insects etc

The two groups that you mention belong to two separated branches in the animal kingdom. The fly and all insects are protostomes and the rabbit and all mammals are deuterostomes. In the first, the ...
heracho's user avatar
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1 vote
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Is evolution theory falsifiable by whether mutations result in a loss or gain of genetic information?

This might not have a purely objective answer. For example: Most people lose the ability to digest milk by their teens. A few thousand years ago, however, after the domestication of cattle, several ...
got trolled too much this week's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Book on the history of Darwin's discoveries and development of his theory

I'm not certain it fills every element of your question, but I really enjoyed Michael Ruse's "The Darwinian Revolution: Science Red in Tooth and Claw." It's especially good for setting up the ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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1 vote

Time taken for species to become endemic

From wikipedia > endemism: Endemism is the ecological state of a species being unique to a defined geographic location, such as an island, nation, country or other defined zone, or habitat type. ...
Remi.b's user avatar
  • 68.2k
1 vote

Spider identification please

It think this spider is a Tegenaria domestica also known as the barn funnel weaver in North America and the domestic house spider in Europe. See here or here (picture taken from the first link): They ...
Chris's user avatar
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1 vote
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Practical Question about Evolution, Population Genetics and Speciation

Infertile descendants indeed sound like a disadvantage. Individual must invest a fair amount of resources into making an offspring. Making sterile offspring is just a waste of resources as those ...
Remi.b's user avatar
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