26

This is not a hornet, this is an Ichneumonidea wasp, which is a superfamily of parasitoid wasps with about 100,000 species. I would go so far as to think it is within the Ichneumonidae family and think that it is probably Rhyssa lineolata, though I am certainly no entomologist of any sort. Note that because there are so many species, it might be quite hard ...


5

My hunch is that it's a hoverfly (family Syrphidae). (DISCLAIMER: I'm no expert in flies and am more or less educated guessing.) Here is an example picture of a somewhat-morphologically similar species (North American species, but whose genus is found in the neotropics): Toxomerus marginatus ; Credit: Ron Hemberger ; Source: Cornell University ...


4

There is a way to classify insect wings: the Comstock-Needham system. From Wikipedia: The Comstock–Needham system is a naming system for insect wing veins, devised by John Comstock and George Needham in 1898. It was an important step in showing the homology of all insect wings. This system was based on Needham's pretracheation theory that was later ...


3

Its definitely not a marine mammal, just based on size and general configuration. those convoluted ever growing teeth are pretty diagnostic of non-cetacean ungulates. Just based on the pattern I would say bovidae, but that does not narrow it down much in turkey, the H shaped central portion is fairly diagnostic of bovidae. However you have several antelope ...


2

Short answer This is Magicicada septendecula, one of the three species of 17-year cicada (colloquially, "17 year locust") native to the Eastern United states. Credit: C. Simon, Fontaine et al (2007)1 Long answer Periodic cicadas are the only group of dark-bodied cicadas with bright red eyes and orange/red-tinted wings (at least I don't know of ...


2

This does indeed seem to be a viscacha, which are actually found in South America (not Siberia). Their morphological similarity to rabbits is simply a case of convergent evolution, as these animals are in the rodent order (Rodentia) [whearas rabbits are order Lagomorpha]. Viscacha consist of two genera (Lagidium and Lagostomus). However, your image much more ...


2

Short answer I would also guess it's Smilax herbacea, but let me go a step further and explain why... LEFT: NC State Extension ; RIGHT: SEINet Long Answer This does indeed appear to be a species of Smilax, a genus of climbing and sometimes woody plants often found with prickles. The group often picks up the colloquial name "greenbriers," and ...


2

I Wanted to add a more thorough answer to this post (with some pictures) since they are bound to get a lot of press (and questions) this summer (2021) -- more on that later.... Short answer This is the abandoned exoskeleton (called an "exuviae") of a molted cicada nymph. Credit: Valeriy Kirsanov/Fotolia, Britannica.com Here is a time-lapse of ...


2

This is a carpet beetle, although identifying the exact species is difficult. Compare for example the varied carpet beetle, Anthrenus verbasci: from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varied_carpet_beetle#/media/File:Dermestidae_-_Anthrenus_verbasci.JPG


2

I have no expertise in (French) insects, but this looks like it might be a crane fly (family: Tipulidae) in the genus Ctenophora. The larvae of these flies feed on decaying wood, so a lack of (partially) dead trees or other dead wood in your vicinity would suggest this is not correct. The hunched-back with long legs are suggestive of the crane-fly family ...


1

To add to @AL's answer. This is a beetle of the Dermestidae family. These are a failry diverse group of beetles with a variety of names based on what they are most commonly found eating. Some of the species are specialist eaters of decaying animals. As you have found this one inside it is likely that you have one of the species known as Carpet Beetles. I ...


1

This appears to be a Glenea multiguttata, a beetle species found in India. Compare: from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Black_and_Yellow_Longhorn_Beetle_005.JPG


1

I agree with JimN - this appears to be one of the cribbelate ground spiders in the Amaurobius group. The defensive position of the forelegs is pretty standard, and the rather diffuse abdominal pattern is also consistent. Here's a picture of the common worldwide species Amaurobius ferox for comparison: These spiders and their relatives can give a painful ...


1

It's eating a flicker woodpecker. And yes, it did kill it and is eating it. Crows and ravens are omnivorous but also predators. They will opportunistically kill any small prey they can catch. Most birds are too quick for a crow, but flickers and all woodpeckers are notoriously slow flyers. It's about the only type of bird that is both small enough and slow ...


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