6

Yes, it does seem to be a Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis). Not a hazard to people. Photos from Italian language wikipedia. This ref below suggests it may be looking for somewhere indoors to wait out the winter. It lays eggs on conifer leaves. http://www.zin.ru/animalia/coleoptera/pdf/steyrer_perny_2008_new_insect_species_in_austria.pdf &...


3

Bagworms? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagworm_moth I don't know how destructive individual species are. They probably aren't more than an aesthetic concern.


2

Just by its appearance and location, that’s maybe a Pale Tussock (Calliteara pudibunda), a kind of moth found in Central Europe. You can find some observations of that species on iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/205294-Calliteara-pudibunda?locale=en-GB


2

That appears to be a zebra jumping spider (Salticus scenicus). It is fairly widespread throughout North America. It does not post any kind of threat to people or to the environment: Here is a map of iNaturalist observations for zebra jumping spiders. And here is a gallery of photos you can view: https://inaturalist.ca/taxa/68901-Salticus-scenicus/...


2

This is a blue button jellyfish! they eat zooplankton and are usually found drifting along on currents they aren't true jellyfish and just like a jellyfish have no blood, brain or nervous system. they aren't usually toxic enough to hurt but can cause irritation to the skin. they live in warm waters off of Europe and in the golf of Mexico and the ...


2

Dasypogon is a genus of robber flies in the family Asilidae. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Insecta Order: Diptera , Family: Asilidae Tribe:Dasypogonini Genus:Dasypogon. 84 species belong to the genus Dasypogon. Among these, this one is Asilidae Dasypogon diadema.


2

dark bands between segments and long tails match: Distribution matches:


1

It is not a pseudoscorpion as those would have 8 legs and then the two front large pincers. This is most likely a kind a jumping spider where the two large front legs count as two of the 8 legs. Depending on your geography (not given in the question), this looks to resemble a jumping spider in the genus Chalcolecta (or some regional variant of that based on ...


1

It is hard to be sure without clearer pictures, but that looks like something in the genus Eriocampa and it could be a Butternut Woollyworm (Eriocampa juglandis). Picture taken in Kentucky from BugGuide.net © 2015 by dan40165: These are the larvae of a sawfly (so not technically a caterpillar) and are about 1 inch long. You can learn more about this ...


1

I’m fairly sure it is a centipede. However, the picture is too fuzzy to make out the exact species. You can try comparing with the many recorded observations of centipedes around Texas: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=18&taxon_id=49556


1

It appears to be a cultivar of Jujube (Ziziphus zizyphus) also known as Chinese date - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jujube This is based on JimN's correct observation. I looked at a few dozen images of Ziziphus Zizyphus - both fruit and leaves. They appear to be identical. The fruit tastes as described. The fruiting progression matches the description in ...


1

Looks to be in the family Dictyopharidae, a long nosed planthopper. This analysis is not absolute as there are exceptions. There are two features to put it in Dictyopharidae and Fulgoridae. The (tiny) antennae are below the eyes, not between them; and the head has a big protrusion. The pattern and placement of spines on the legs, and the pattern of veins on ...


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