9

Looks like the Large Indian civet. Notice the size and the fur coloration pattern on the neck. From wikipedia: The large Indian civet ranges from Nepal, northeast India, Bhutan, Bangladesh to Myanmar, Thailand, the Malay peninsula and Singapore to Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam and China.[1] Looks like it is found in eastern parts of Bangladesh including ...


7

(Note: I'm going to be using the British English "ladybird" instead of the US English "ladybug" in this answer.) This is a clearly a species of ladybird. Going by the number of spots, their size and not-perfectly-round shape, the positioning of the four central spots relative to the others, and the fact that its background colour isn't bright yellow... I'm ...


6

I found the name: it appears to be Garcinia humilis, known commonly as achachairú or achach: Garcinia humilis, known commonly as achachairú or achacha, is a small, prolifically-fruiting tree related to the mangosteen. It grows in the southern part of the Amazon basin in the central area of Bolivia, but has recently been planted on a commercial scale in ...


5

It looks like a terrestrial ribbon worm. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ad/Terrestrial_Ribbon_Worm_%28Nemertini%29_%2822799575773%29.jpg Nemertean worms are not leeches, but a different group of worms. Most are marine but there are a few terrestrial ones. This depicted worm is from Borneo and other terrestrial nemertean worms are from ...


4

This is not a bedbug. This is a hemipteran called a leaf-footed bug in the Coreidae family. (Note: bedbugs are also in the order Hemiptera, but in a different family). Species similar to yours found in Poland include Coreus marginatus (or "dock bug"), which [according to Wikipedia], is found throughout Europe. Adult male and nymph shown from dorsal and ...


4

That is a parasitic wasp in the family, Ichneumonidae. You can tell by looking for a cell in the forewing that looks like a horse head. The "stinger" is an ovipositor. These wasps lay their eggs in the larvae of other insects


4

I'm no expert in slime molds, but your specimens do in fact look a lot like the sporangia, or spore-producing reproductive structures (i.e., fruiting bodies), of a Mycetozoan slime mold in the class Myxogastria. Physarum and Comatricha are possible candidate genera based on structure of their sporangia that I can find easily online. See below for an ...


2

Based on the location and image you provided, I suspect this spider to be Garden Orb-Weaver, belonging to the spider family Araneidae. Just a side note: I used an app called iNaturalist to identify this spider. It is a helpful app to identify insects and plants. Here is a similar image I found online:


1

I finally got frustrated enough to dig up A Revision of the Liasis childreni species-group (Serpentes: Boidae) L.A. Smith, 1985 - the original paper that split up this species complex, and when even Smith made primary determinations off of pattern and color alone, I took matters into my own hands and dug into the his raw data. I have compiled the mean ...


1

They look to me like cockroach nymphs (newly hatched cockroaches). Note the long antennae (more than body length) and the two short protuberances at the rear. Also note that bed bugs have a head distinct from the body, whereas cockroaches have a head that blends into the body. 3 mm cockroach nymph (from Wikipedia) A bed bug (from Wikipedia) See also this ...


1

I think you are looking at Syzygium jambos in the Myrtaceae. The first link at Wikipedia has a number of pictures which are quite similar to your pictures.


1

I suspect this is a hemipteran, an assasin bug. I think this because of the shape of the legs, the reduced elytra and the bulgy eyes. If you had a picture from the side which would show the profile of the mouthparts, and if they happened to be protruding in the shape of a stylet, i'd be more confident that it is a type of assasin bug. Its definitely trying ...


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