4

It's a greater bee fly, Bombylius major, a nectar feeder and generalist floral pollinator which pollinates hundreds of species of flowers. It lays eggs near real bee nests and it's larvae feed from the bee larvae. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombylius_major


4

That looks like a Funnelweb Weaver (family Agelenidae), specifically Tegenaria atrica, based on the patterning of the abdomen and thorax. Female Tegenaria atrica, picture by Jørgen Lissner Their range includes Poland: Range: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Faroe Islands (introduced), Finland, France (Corsica), ...


3

UPDATE: I was not paying close enough attention to size. If the feces is as small as the OP mentions in the comment below this post ("20+ of these scat in an acorn"), then this is very unlikely porcupine!! Instead, the size and shape suggests the feces belong to either a rat (perhaps wood rat) or some type of squirrel. I await an update form the ...


3

Your pictures are quite blurry, but I think this is an Osmia, ie a Mason bee (and not a bumble bee). I think you can see a tendency of the “horns” that female Osmia bicornis (red mason bee) have on their heads on your pictures, so this is my guess. Females are much larger and generally darker than males on the thorax and head, and often quite black there ...


2

The video you linked to, and from which you got the still shot. is real. There are hundreds of such videos now that Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) are more commonplace. ...could the output from the ROV thrusters rip it apart(?) A working class ROV needed for deep ocean floor exploration can be the size of an SUV. There's no reason to believe ...


1

The animal in the photos is actually a female of Osmia cornuta. The horns are quite visible, which makes us exclude Osmia bicolor, and the thorax is entirely covered with black hair, which makes us exclude Osmia bicornis.


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