8 votes

Shrub in open gravel field

Almost certainly Hawthorn (Crataegus) genus. This is a fairly common genus of flowering and fruiting shrubs to small trees that produce white flowers in the spring and small red apple-shaped (pome) ...
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  • 7,783
8 votes
Accepted

Identifying a Texan horned butterfly

This appears to be an American (or common) snout (Libytheana carinenta). The "snout" of this butterfly is very distinctive as is the squarish tip of the forewings (the part projecting ...
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  • 5,296
6 votes
Accepted

Lumpy green balls on tomato leaf

The shape of those looks more like caterpillar droppings (frass) than galls to me, though I've never seen them so green or shiny. Here's an image of tomato hornworm droppings, it looks quite similar ...
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  • 3,260
5 votes

Is this poison ivy?

Yes, this is very likely to be poison ivy. It has all the right hallmarks (trifoliate leaves, long petiole, ovate leaflets with few teeth, shiny blades, and slightly elongated central petiolule), in ...
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  • 1,568
4 votes
Accepted

Please help me identify this plant. Is the fruit edible?

This is a huckleberry or related vaccinium, Vaccinium parvifolium probably. It looks unripe to me. I'd wait till August or September. Some are unpalatable/sour but they are nominally edible.
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4 votes

Volunteer/seedling in Toronto garden

I think that this is one of the beggarticks, in the genus Bidens. There are several possibilities in your area, including B. connata, B. frondosa, and B. vulgata. I think more detail would be needed ...
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  • 1,568
4 votes

Is this poison ivy?

This appears to be poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans). Descriptions (Univ of Michigan) Distinguished by alternate compound leaves composed of three leaflets, the middle leaflet petiolule longer ...
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4 votes

What insect is this? Found in a dying tree

From Gil Wizen's page, it's a wasp. Giant ichneumon wasps (genus Megarhyssa) are some of the biggest North American wasps thanks to the females’ long (10cm) ovipositor, which is longer than the wasp’...
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3 votes

Is this a bear poo on trees?

In your photograph, it looks like the crown of a small conifer. Unless a bear reached up to swing the top down to assist in the force applied to its behind, it's unlikely that a bear's poop would be ...
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2 votes

What is this unusual butterfly?

It's a moth, specifically a Jersey Tiger Moth - can be seen in parts of the UK, more usually the south west, though it seems to be spreading more within the UK. Info here https://butterfly-...
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  • 376
1 vote

Identification of insect casing

Note: I'm no expert and not even from North America, so take this with a grain of salt. I think this is a May Beetle (Phyllophaga genus) or possibly a Junebug from the widespread scarab family of ...
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  • 7,783
1 vote

Lumpy green balls on tomato leaf

Galls, the plants reaction to certain insects. Generally no action is warranted because of minimal harm to the host plant.
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