7

This appears to be a "Monkey slug" caterpillar (Phobetron spp) of the family Limacodidae (or slug moths). According to these sites (here and here), caterpillars of this type are commonly referred to in Portuguese as "Lagarta-Aranha" (or "lesma-macaco") [literally, "spider caterpillar" and "monkey slug" in English]. The most common Phobetron species I can ...


4

It is an Orb Weaver (Neoscona crucifera). It is found from Maine to Florida in the east, to Minnesota in the Midwest, to Arizona in the southwest, and in Mexico. Females are about 9.5–19 millimeters (0.37–0.75 in) long, while males are somewhat smaller. The upper surface of the abdomen is brown and hairy. The legs display alternating light and dark brown ...


3

It looks a lot like a African sacred ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus) (wikilink). However, given your location in India, the closely related Black-headed ibis (which some consider to be part of the same species) might be more likely. The African sacred ibis is native to mainly sub-saharan Africa, but is considered Invasive in some parts of the world (inkl. ...


3

No, most of the time you cannot. There is a large diversity of ladybug species (several dozens in western Europe), and many of them can have the same number of spots. Moreover, as you already said, there can be intraspecific variation in the number of spots. I do not know if there are specific numbers of spots that would be associated to only one species - ...


2

I believe it's a Dieffenbachia, see also this question & answer from Gardening.SE: https://gardening.stackexchange.com/questions/9765/what-is-this-thick-stemmed-houseplant-with-variegated-leaves though I am not sure of the species, it could be Dieffenbachia seguine which shows a similar coloration and is one of the taller species (I believe some of the ...


2

That's one of — quite a few, we have to say — the mistakes Darwin made in his edition from 1859 (I have to confess that this is the only edition I've read, and I reckon this is the only edition anyone should read). This mistake is even more contrasting if you realize that he failed to apply the very same reasoning he had made just a few pages ...


2

Possibly Vaccinium gaultherioides (sometimes considered a subspecies of Vaccinium uliginosum), which are present throughout the Alps. For example, see InfoFlora*: Vaccinium gaultherioides Bigelow, © Konrad Lauber – Flora Helvetica – 2012 Haupt Bern You can see the prevelance of this species throughout the Swiss alps in the below range map (also from ...


1

To me that looks like Chrysomphalina chrysophylla, which is one of several fungi superficially similar to the chanterelles. (The chanterelle in contrast has gradual increase in the diameter of the stalk rather than a sharp demarkation between the stalk and cap.) Chrysomphalina chrysophylla is a species that has been reported in Washington: Source: Burke ...


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