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It's a type of begonia. With 1800 species in the genus, it's hard to say which it is, but the leaves which seem palmate would place it in the aconitifolia species. Your leaves don't appear to be variegated, and your flower is deeper pink, but it's the same flower species.


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Myriostoma is a fungal genus in the family Geastraceae. The genus is monotypic, containing the single species Myriostoma coliforme. It is an earthstar, so named because the spore-bearing sac's outer wall splits open into the shape of a star. Source: Wikipedia. But this recent article shows otherwise https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/08ea/...


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That is a dermestid larva. A beetle from the family Dermestidae https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dermestidae, common name, skin beetle. They eat dried skin, or flesh, and are generally the last insect to feed on a carcass. They are the bane of insect collectors, because they eat dried insects right off the pin.


1

A local graduate student relayed the answer to me. It is an ootheca of a praying mantis. There is some additional background on the egg life history here. Wikipedia reports there are three mantid species. The upper-left picture of the ootheca here is essentially what I observed, so we may be looking at the genus Stagmomantis. There are some other great ...


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Looks to me like an Indus Valley bullfrog (Hoplobatrachus tigerinus). Your specimen would be a bit small, but the species is nocturnal, the area fits and the patterning looks like a decent match as well: (taken from the Wikipedia page)


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Looks like a common green stink bug - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_stink_bug Give it a test. If you put it into a handkerchief and scare it a little, it should give off a foul smelling odor


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This is an ant in the genus Camponotus. It can only be identified from the habitus on your picture, but clues are that there is only one element between the thorax and the gaster (Formicinae) and the head is large, this with the color and texture pattern leads to Camponotus sp. Refer to Bolton, B., Alpert, G., Ward, P. S., & Naskrecki, P. (2006). ...


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