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Corixidae (Water-boatmen). Aquatic insect comprising 6 subfamilies and 55 genera. (The Wikipedia page's right-hand panel contradicts the detail below that). Size 2 - 15 mm long (0.1 - 0.6 inches), six legs, the front pair are hairy and shaped like oars. Feeding on aquatic plants and algae they range worldwide except Antarctica. If I couldn't guess from the ...


3

This appears to be a springtail (Collembola). I'm not familiar with Sri Lankan fauna, but the overall body plan (kind of oval, pudgy, short-legged) reminds me of a subgroup of springtails, the Poduromorpha. You can see similar-looking species in the Superfamily Neanuroidea, which are an example group in the Poduromorpha order: Brachystomella parvula from ...


3

This is a wolf spider. It is not Tegenaria because you would see long spinnerets at the back end of the abdomen, and the legs would not have splotchy black marks, but instead have bands of dark annulations throughout the length of the legs. Zooming in, you can see the lycosidae eyes that are diagnostic of wolf spiders. These are the two eyes that are on top ...


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That is almost certainly the larva of a carpet beetle, likely the Furniture Carpet Beetle (Anthrenus flavipes). They are distinctively hairy and striped. (image from wikimedia) Carpet beetles are found world-wide and are a pest of homes, workplaces, museums, basically anywhere that textiles, paper, or foods are contained. They will happily eat wool, silk, ...


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To complete this post, I want to include my answer based on my research which will server as a complementary answer to @BactiPrabha's answer. As @BactiPrabha pointed out, they are "green leaphoppers". There are different types of leaphoppers which implies that the 1st image and 2nd image are not same. The 1st image is Cicadella viridis. This ...


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This is a cockroach Note the flattened body, long antennae, "hidden" short head, and spiny strong legs Without more details, location or better photos, ID to species is not certain. The most likely species to be found as pests in buildings in the US include: Oriental, German, and brown banded roaches. Common outdoor species that also often come ...


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I'm not an entomologist at all, or even in Europe, so take my answer with a grain of salt. I think this is a beetle of the long-horn beetles, which are all beetles that have a larval stage that borrow in wood. In particular I think this is in the genus Clytus and may be Clytus arietis, which is quite common in Europe and North America. There are other ...


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From the google search I did,guess they are green leafhoppers. To find more on the leafhopper of the second half, this link should help .Reach the site and give a search on green leafhoppers in the searchbar. Well,there are a large no of leafhoppers under the family Cicadellidae and I believe the ones in the picture differ. If my findings are correct,...


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