110

Great picture and great find. But unfortunately I don't think that is a new species of bird...or even a bird at all! It looks like a hummingbird hawk-moth, Macroglossum stellatarum. Here you can really see the 'little trunk' (as you described it) known as a proboscis, which it uses to feed on flowers. Fun fact: It's believed not to be a mimic of the ...


61

It is American Woodcock, Scolopax minor. Superbly camouflaged against the leaf litter, the brown-mottled American Woodcock walks slowly along the forest floor, probing the soil with its long bill in search of earthworms. Unlike its coastal relatives, this plump little shorebird lives in young forests and shrubby old fields across eastern North America. ...


59

Unfortunately, you're the first I've seen on here actually to have a bed bug. See this picture from University of Kentucky for comparison: Here is one moving (more footage & info here): Below is a picture from Bed-Bugs-Handbook.com demonstrating the relative size and appearance of 6 different life (molt) stages: From Left to Right: Nymphs to adults ...


58

Those are isolated turtle bones: Specifically, they are part of the carapace, or upper shell. The projections would articulate with the backbone. The "toothlike" structure at the other end projects down toward the margin of the shell. Based on the size, and the fact that you are in Missouri, I'm guessing they are snapping turtle bones. Here's a photo of ...


44

This actually looks like a Gaudy Sphinx caterpillar (Eumorpha labruscae). It only mimics the appearance of a snake! You can find more information about this species here. Range: Argentina north through Central America, Mexico, and the West Indies to Florida, Mississippi, South Texas, and Arizona. Strays to Missouri, southern Michigan, Pennsylvania, Maine, ...


41

Given the large eyes, the almost non-existent antennae, the humped back, elongated abdomen and the wings, I'd say it is a robber fly. It is one of many insects known to prey on wasps. Note the description on the linked page: This spindly piece of nastiness is a Robber Fly in the genus Diogmites. It seems that it's members of this particular genus that ...


39

I've found whatbird.com to be pretty good for identifying American birds. Asking it for grey and brown medium-sized birds that are commonly found in Texas gives 14 options, of which the best match is the American woodcock, as suggested by Sanjukta (which is conveniently early on the alphabetical list!)


36

That is the caterpillar of a lobster moth (Stauropus fagi), family Notodotidae. It is mimicking a scorpion to help protect it from predation. An amazing insect.


36

You have a Dosima: Also known as a Buoy Barnacle. A gallery of observations of these can be found here: https://inaturalist.ca/taxa/462188-Dosima/browse_photos They are found in the coastal UK and Spain area, New Zealand, and east and west N.America: (source: iNaturalist observations) These barnacles attach themselves to things that float, and if they don't ...


32

It is the larva of Harmonia axyridis (Asian lady beetle). The image posted by timbernasley is more accurate because the larva you have shown is in its late instar ,a stage not an early as this one. Here's the link: Wikipedia


31

This is the "Acer palmatum" or Japanese maple, which shows a wide variety of different leaf forms (from here): Specically you found "Acer palmatum dissectum 'Red Dragon'", for more information look here (picture also from this site):


29

That's some kind of mole cricket (Gryllotalpidae). According to this website there's only three species found so far in Romania: Gryllotalpa gryllotalpa Gryllotalpa stepposa Gryllotalpa unispina It's most likely you've encountered a specimen of the first species as it's the most common and widespread one in Europe, Gryllotalpa gryllotalpa:


29

Based on the size and location that appears to be a Common mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus). (Photo © Brian Gratwicke — CC BY) The four toes visible on the front foot are also consistent with this identification. This species is found throughout eastern North America and you can learn more about them from the Canadian herpetological society and iNaturalist.


28

This looks a lot like a double-barred finch (Taeniopygia bichenovii). Your note about this being an "owl-like" bird is supported by it's less common name, the "owl finch", so named for the dark ring around the face. Source: Wikipedia; Credit: Glen Fergus If this is in fact the bird you saw, you're right that it's not native to your country (or continent ...


27

This is not a hornet, this is an Ichneumonidea wasp, which is a superfamily of parasitoid wasps with about 100,000 species. I would go so far as to think it is within the Ichneumonidae family and think that it is probably Rhyssa lineolata, though I am certainly no entomologist of any sort. Note that because there are so many species, it might be quite hard ...


26

This is a species in the Peristediidae family, commonly called armored searobins or armored gurnards. found in deep waters around the world, with most species in tropical regions. They are related to the searobins in the family Triglidae, and some authorities classify them in that family,2[3] but they are encased in heavy scales with prominent spines. ...


26

It's definitely a bird pelvis (synsacrum). Based on the size (~30 cm), it came from a very large bird. Unfortunately, comparative images of bird pelves are rare on the internet. Some possibilities (large birds of Sweden possibly found on the coast): Great northern loon Golden eagle Common crane A loon skeleton (from http://paolov.wordpress.com/2011/08/05/...


24

It's a larva of a green lacewing (Family Chrysopidae). Yes, they can bite hard but you're not its intended victim and they're not only harmless but beneficial as they're aggressive predators of aphids and other soft bodied plant pests. I can't be specific to what species of lacewing as they look fairly similar. Another larva that looks very similar to yours....


23

This is actually not a gall as other answers have suggested. This is likely a fungus called Cedar-apple rust (Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae). The fungus only thrives in the presence of both Juniperus virginiana (Eastern red cedar) and apple (Malus spp.) trees. The leaf in the picture belongs to some species of the apple genus and the growths are ...


22

Welcome to Biology StackExchange. Am I remembering this incorrectly? No, you're remembering it correctly. I think you're talking about slime molds. You'll find more information on the wiki page Is this the video you saw? These images are pretty cool. Is this even possible? Yes (given that it exists). There is no way to correctly answer this ...


22

Though I cannot be 100% sure from the sound quality, it certainly does sound/seem like bats are making the calls you are hearing/seeing. I spent a number of years as a bat bioacoustics researcher and I came across similar sounds frequently and was able to confirm they came from foraging bats. I'll have to see if I can find any old spectrograms or ...


22

It looks as though it has a keel along it's back (the area behind the mantle shield.) If so (and I think it is), it would be a keelback slug, the coloration strongly suggesting a leopard slug (Limax maximus): Coloration varies but the general pattern is a spotted spotted mantle sheild about a third of its length in size, with a striped tail. The major ...


21

Its definitely a True bug (Hemiptera), and based on its distinct pronotum and small head I'm guessing its a Wheel bug (Arilus cristatus). It is a common species that is also found in Indiana. They are aggresive predators and are part of the family Reduviidae also known as Assassin bugs. Assassin bugs have a painful bite, and they inject a toxin when they ...


21

This is the nest of a Mud dauber, also known as Mud wasp. This was possibly made by a Black and Yellow Mud dauber based on the following information. The nest of the black and yellow mud dauber is a simple, one-cell, urn-shaped nest. 1* As for expecting something coming out of it? I doubt it, as the nests are sealed after depositing an egg. After building ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible