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As Karl mentioned in his comment, this is a jumping spider in the family Salticidae. Based on the your location and the coloration, I would suppose this might be Phidippus adumbratus. Source: Wikimedia You can see more pictures here and here. I don't think the angle nor zoom quality of your photo can be used to definitively ID your specimen to species....


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The pictures are not entirely clear, but I’m relatively certain that it is a wood wasp of the genus Xiphydria (family Xiphydriidae). Traits that point to this is e.g. 2 pair of wings (i.e. a wasp and not a fly), narrow slender antenna, elongated body, the shape of the head sitting on a relatively long “neck”, often with light/white markings on the top and or ...


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I think that is a soldier fly. https://animals.howstuffworks.com/insects/will-black-soldier-fly-maggots-save-humanity.htm The adults do not eat or sting, only mate, lay eggs and die. The maggots are very large and awesome devourers of rotten fruit. They alternate with worms in my worm bin depending on season. I have no idea what they are doing in your ...


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It is an Orb Weaver (Neoscona crucifera). It is found from Maine to Florida in the east, to Minnesota in the Midwest, to Arizona in the southwest, and in Mexico. Females are about 9.5–19 millimeters (0.37–0.75 in) long, while males are somewhat smaller. The upper surface of the abdomen is brown and hairy. The legs display alternating light and dark brown ...


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No, most of the time you cannot. There is a large diversity of ladybug species (several dozens in western Europe), and many of them can have the same number of spots. Moreover, as you already said, there can be intraspecific variation in the number of spots. I do not know if there are specific numbers of spots that would be associated to only one species - ...


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Possibly Vaccinium gaultherioides (sometimes considered a subspecies of Vaccinium uliginosum), which are present throughout the Alps. For example, see InfoFlora*: Vaccinium gaultherioides Bigelow, © Konrad Lauber – Flora Helvetica – 2012 Haupt Bern You can see the prevelance of this species throughout the Swiss alps in the below range map (also from ...


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To me that looks like Chrysomphalina chrysophylla, which is one of several fungi superficially similar to the chanterelles. (The chanterelle in contrast has gradual increase in the diameter of the stalk rather than a sharp demarkation between the stalk and cap.) Chrysomphalina chrysophylla is a species that has been reported in Washington: Source: Burke ...


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They should be Red Imported Fireants. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_imported_fire_ant


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This appears to be a "Monkey slug" caterpillar (Phobetron spp) of the family Limacodidae (or slug moths). According to these sites (here and here), caterpillars of this type are commonly referred to in Portuguese as "Lagarta-Aranha" (or "lesma-macaco") [literally, "spider caterpillar" and "monkey slug" in English]. The most common Phobetron species I can ...


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I think the spider you have found must be https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tegenaria_domestica In europe this is called the Domestic house spider,It can bite humans and pets the bite is painless. This spider is common in Europe-USA-Canada.


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I believe it's a Dieffenbachia, see also this question & answer from Gardening.SE: https://gardening.stackexchange.com/questions/9765/what-is-this-thick-stemmed-houseplant-with-variegated-leaves though I am not sure of the species, it could be Dieffenbachia seguine which shows a similar coloration and is one of the taller species (I believe some of the ...


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That's one of — quite a few, we have to say — the mistakes Darwin made in his edition from 1859 (I have to confess that this is the only edition I've read, and I reckon this is the only edition anyone should read). This mistake is even more contrasting if you realize that he failed to apply the very same reasoning he had made just a few pages ...


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