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3

This appears to be the underside of a walnut orbweaver: These orbweaver spiders are not medically significant. Spiders often lose their legs in wasp attacks. Some spider wasps will remove the legs and then try to bring the spider to its nest for larvae to feed on. Sometimes they drop their spider victims accidentally. Some will simply deposit eggs into the ...


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The images in the question are of a giant house spider, as hypothesized in the question. (Eratigena duellica/atrica/saeva). These (along with the hobo spider, Eratigena agrestis) do not have any banding or annulations in their legs (dark/light stripes/rings). The spider in the other answer of Tegenaria domestica do (always) exhibit leg banding. So, it is not ...


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This has been identified as scat from flying squirrels (Glaucomys volans) by several biologists in the county. It is apparently the first documentation of the species in this area.


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It's a greater bee fly, Bombylius major, a nectar feeder and generalist floral pollinator which pollinates hundreds of species of flowers. It lays eggs near real bee nests and it's larvae feed from the bee larvae. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombylius_major


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UPDATE: I was not paying close enough attention to size. If the feces is as small as the OP mentions in the comment below this post ("20+ of these scat in an acorn"), then this is very unlikely porcupine!! Instead, the size and shape suggests the feces belong to either a rat (perhaps wood rat) or some type of squirrel. I await an update form the ...


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The video you linked to, and from which you got the still shot. is real. There are hundreds of such videos now that Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) are more commonplace. ...could the output from the ROV thrusters rip it apart(?) A working class ROV needed for deep ocean floor exploration can be the size of an SUV. There's no reason to believe ...


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That looks like a Funnelweb Weaver (family Agelenidae), specifically Tegenaria atrica, based on the patterning of the abdomen and thorax. Female Tegenaria atrica, picture by Jørgen Lissner Their range includes Poland: Range: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Faroe Islands (introduced), Finland, France (Corsica), ...


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The animal in the photos is actually a female of Osmia cornuta. The horns are quite visible, which makes us exclude Osmia bicolor, and the thorax is entirely covered with black hair, which makes us exclude Osmia bicornis.


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Your pictures are quite blurry, but I think this is an Osmia, ie a Mason bee (and not a bumble bee). I think you can see a tendency of the “horns” that female Osmia bicornis (red mason bee) have on their heads on your pictures, so this is my guess. Females are much larger and generally darker than males on the thorax and head, and often quite black there ...


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As the embryo of a seed typically contains many cells, it should in theory be possible to obtain DNA from a seed without disrupting it (there may be pragmatic issues with protocol, depending on the particulars of the seed). If you have the DNA and each seed has been produced by a separate fertilization event, then each seeds DNA would be unique and it should ...


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