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It's a phereoeca uterella or commonly known as plaster bag worm. It belongs to the family of the moth and it eats silk, cashmere etc clothes and also eats spider web. It's size depends on what it eats. It belongs to phylum arthropoda. You can find rest on the internet


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Based on the morphology of the abdomen and antennae as well as the darker coloration, I'm going to say they are not. Looks a bit more ant-like (see picture).


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The picture looks like it's from the Cerastes genus. It looks similar to a head shot of Cerastes Cerastes (Saharan horned viper) shown on Wikipedia: In fact, the incident you describe is also reported in Wikipedia's Cerastes Cerastes article since it could be the first sighting in Pakistan. However, I sincerely (and respectfully) doubt that this snake was ...


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At a glance it looks like a flattened perfectly ordinary dead woodlouse to me.


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This Times of India article mentions the name "peevna" in relation to the "saw-scaled viper". According to Wikipedia, the genus Echis contains 12 species that are commonly referred to as a group as "saw-scaled vipers." Of these, one clearly is found in India: Echis_carinatus (commonly called the "saw-scaled viper", "Indian saw-scaled viper", or "little ...


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Those are not larvae, but adult millipedes. Myriopoda, Diplopoda. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millipede Here is a good link from the U of Minnesota on common arthropods in the basement. https://extension.umn.edu/insect-relatives/sowbugs-millipedes-and-centipedes


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I have no idea how to start You probably need an "identification key", or some kind of guide, that will help you identify the plant based on a series of questions or identification criteria. To be able to use such keys or guides, you will need to familiarize yourself with technical vocabulary used in plant description. Some idea of the kind of ecosystem ...


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That appears to a "bag worm", which is as you surmised a caterpillar. This suggest that it is from the family Psychidae, but I won't even try to guess at the species. However, if you see any adults you may be able to identify them using this website. An example image of an North American species:


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Interesting! See those long spines on the legs? Only two groups of spiders (that come to mind, anyway) have that sort of arrangement: Lynx Spiders (Family Oxyopidae) and Pirate Spiders (Family Mimetidae). Lynx Spiders are wandering hunters, and the ones I'm familiar with tend to have a body shape more like the familiar Grass Spiders (longish, tear-drop ...


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Yes, that is a pillbug, or "roly-poly", Subphylum, Crustacea, class Malacostraca, family Armadillidiidae. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armadillidiidae


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It's hard to tell from your photo, but you should check whether Macroglossum stellatarum (German: Taubenschwänzchen/ English: hummingbird hawk-moth) looks similar to what you've seen. This moth is living in Germany (and other regions) and due to it's way of flying (hovering and audible humming) it's sometimes confused with a hummingbird.


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It looks like a male Linyphiid, most probably a Frontinellina frutetorum Source: https://ednieuw.home.xs4all.nl/Spiders/Linyphiidae/Linyphiidae.htm Thanks to John Robinson and Ed Nieuwenhuys who helped get a probable match for this spider.


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Looks like it is Phytolacca dioica. I found this by searching your first image in a phone app called Pl@ntNet (PlantNet). Looking at Wikipedia confirms the ID. Interestingly, you said the fruit was sweet. The North American relative Phytolacca americana is extremely poisonous. A brief search suggests your species is possibly poisonous, with reports ...


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Interesting! The size, shape and posture, as well as the visible patterning on the body, are all reminiscent of Dolomedes tenebrosus, the common terrestrial fishing spider here in the east. However, there are a couple of odd things here: 1. Dolomedes is a genus only found (as far as I know) in the eastern half of the US, 2. The abdominal color pattern is ...


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Pawelek; Unfortunately, I'm not very experienced at European spiders, but I suspect you're looking in the wrong place. First of all, this appears to be an adult male spider (large ball-like structures at the ends of the pedipalps, in front of the 'face'), so the body pattern is probably going to be a bit different from the one you see on the females. Male ...


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I don't know whether this helps, but that looks like a parrot fish. I had a look online and also didn't find anything with that distinctive pattern. The closest I could find was Scarus ghobban (common names include blue-barred and blue-trim parrotfish), which is highly variable but the blue edges on the fins seem constant. According to the sources linked ...


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Not duck weed. It is Salvinia species very easy to grow ( invasive). I believe it is illegal to introduce in some US states. Koi /carp will eat duck weed.There are a few similar species of salvinia , unfortunately references will give the same name for different plants. My book ( Aquarium Plants ; Barry Jones, Tetra press) calls it auriculata which I believe ...


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Perhaps a white mulberry? See the Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morus_alba


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Hanging upside-down in a web suggests one of several groups, but in a building structure, and in what appears to be a messy, tangled web, I think we can safely put this one down as a member of the 'cobweb spiders' - the Theridiidae. This group includes the infamous Black Widows, and some are known to successfully take relatively large and dangerous prey. So,...


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That's a very interesting set of colors. Unfortunately nothing springs out at me, although I can think of a couple of birds that might sort of (maybe) match. First, common pigeons come in all sorts of colors and patterns, and it's possible that yours is one. On the other hand, common pigeons tend to be very familiar to most of us, so I don't think you'd be ...


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That is a butterfly known as a "Mapwing". It is in the family Nymphalidae. I'm pretty sure it is Cyrestis maenalis. https://wikivividly.com/wiki/Cyrestis_maenalis


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That is clearly a type of wasp. Some digging leads me to think it could be something in the genus Ammophila (a type of "thread-waisted wasp") for example Ammophila sabulosa: However, 6 cm is huge for a wasp and twice the size of Ammophila sabulosa — are you sure about that length?


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Looks like the family Halictidae to me. Known as a sweat bee. Maybe Lasioglossum zephyrus?


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That looks like a species of syrphid fly (aka. hover fly, flower fly) — not sure about the red fluid, but it probably wasn't blood. These flies are pollinators and the larvae eat pests such as aphids. I don't know for sure what species that is, but it appears very similar to Toxomerus politus: Other sources of information on this group of flies: http://...


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That appears to be what is known as a bagworm: According to the University of Maryland extension Home & Garden Information Center, they can cause significant damage to ornamental plants especially conifers.


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