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1

This is a neophyte that has been recorded in Europe since 1979: Sceliphron curvatum, in German also known as orientalische Mörtelwespe. Unusually large considering what else is buzzing around, but mostly harmless. The nests, or rather individual larvae cells, are made of mud and while there are about thirty species in the genus, only Sceliphron curvatum is ...


0

Was it this? This is another purseweb spider species.


1

It almost definitely wasn't 10 inches, but there are some pretty big spiders in Mexico. There is a species of spitting spider with a 9 inch legspan but it lives in South America not Mexico. Scytodes globula The cellar spider has a legspan of up to 3.6 inches and a comparatively small body with long skinny legs and no visible hair, but I can't see how that ...


2

It's an Ipomea also known as a Morning Glory. There are 600 species of Ipomea including the sweet potato. There are many colors of mixed Ipomea, your one is probably a fairly random hybrid. It is perhaps most similar to Ipomoea Rubriflora and Ipomea Coccinea:


3

This appears to be a flower of a tree in the Syzygium genus. Because there are many species (1200+) -- many which are intentionally planted as ornamentals outside of their native range or have the propensity to become invasive -- I cannot confidently provide a more specific species given the garden location in which you found your specimen (and lack of ...


-1

This is a long-legged fly (Condylostylus spp). Unfortunately your image is not sharp enough to give a specific species. See this post of another Indian fly that is virtually identical to yours: https://www.jungledragon.com/image/13762/long-legged_fly_-_condylostylus_spp.html


6

That looks like a knob-billed duck. Their range includes Sub-Saharan Africa, India, and Southeast Asia. Picture source


1

I believe this is an Arboreal Salamander (Aneides lugubris). http://www.californiaherps.com/identification/bayareaherps.html#Lizards http://www.californiaherps.com/salamanders/images/alugubrisbr1108.jpg


2

That’s maybe an oriental spiny orbweaver (Gasteracantha geminata), according to its appearance and location. You can find many more observations of such spiders on iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/207992-Gasteracantha-geminata?locale=en-GB However, I don’t know what advantage there is to the “spines”. They are not the only species. There’s a ...


1

The white things look like scale insects, you can scrape them (and their waxy fluffy coats) off the leaves. If you can identify the plant, that would also help. The gardening SE is also a good place for these questions.


-1

It is probably a Spider wasp (Episyron albonotatum). See this female spider wasp dragging captured, narcotized Orb-weaving Spider to the nest, in Germany. It migrates to the Brazilian Amazon during the spring season. It may also be an Ichneumon wasp or a mason wasp (like four-toothed mason wasp) or a ground digger wasp and a sand wasp (Stizus fuscipennis). ...


2

Given the presence of a petiole and postpetiole, this is most likely a winged ant (drone or queen), such as this similar one here: https://bugguide.net/node/view/57281


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