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1

This is acaena magellanica which is also called "Buzzy Burr" or "Greater Burnett". See these images for comparision (from here and here):


2

It appears to be a Banana Spider: ... a male Heteropoda venatoria, also called a Banana Spider. The female is a more robust spider with shorter legs. This is the spider that is responsible for the rumors that tarantulas come into the U.S. with bananas because they are often spotted emerging frrom a bunch of bananas in a fruit store in the North. ...


15

That appears to be an Oleander Hawk-moth a member of the Sphinx moth family. I think the only other possibility for Taiwan is the quite similar Jade Hawk-moth, but that supposedly has a dark purplish colored head. Image for comparison: Source: Shantanu Kuveskar / CC BY-SA.


1

That actually looks like some sort of caddisfly larvae in its case to me. Are you sure that's it's 'body' & not a case? Did you find it in water? Or a Case Bearing Clothes Moth (Caddisfly are closely related to moths). This one (a clothes moth larvae) looks very similar to your image.


3

Those are the cotyledons (seed leaves) of spinach. For comparison, here's a picture of what spinach sprouts look like: Source: https://wimastergardener.org/article/spinach-spinacia-oleracea/


-2

It's definitely a species of Huntsman spider maybe of the genus "heteropoda" or "olios". Sorry I couldn't be more help.


11

Based on the distinctive leaf shape and placement of the fruit along the stem that appears to be a papaya. If so then the plant should "bleed" latex (a milky white fluid) when damaged. You can test this by breaking off a small piece leaf. Image credit: By Max.kit - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=54547062


4

It could be Anthrenus verbasci. These insects are not dangerous, but they can damage carpets, clothing and furniture.


1

That specimen is pretty squished, but I'm guessing it's a cave cricket or spider cricket (order Orthoptera; family Rhaphidophoridae). They're very common invaders of cool damp places like basements or air conditioning units. Harmless, but can be quite startling, as most species can jump several feet in one leap.


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