New answers tagged

1

Looks like something in Ctenophora (true crane flies), potentially Ctenophora ornata? They're found in Europe and appear to have similar wing and body coloring, as well as the large antennae: Image from Wikimedia commons, by Jean-Marc Liotier I don't believe crane flies sting, but I am not an entomologist, so I defer to the experts on that point (and the ...


2

I think it's clearly a pupae. They look like fruit fly pupae, which are very common. The size also match the description (length of the fruit fly pupa is about 2.5 mm).


-1

I'm going to go with California Beaked Hazelnut (Corylus cornuta). While it is hard to tell from the chewed outer, it has the reddish-brown colour of hazelnut shell, and inside the shell is a dark brown papery layer. The nut (without the papery layer) is smooth and rounded


1

In lieu of any better thoughts: Thrips (Thysanoptera). A large diverse group of tiny insects generally approximately 1 mm long. Well known for being invasive pests of many plant species, and being capable of transmitting a number of plant viruses. Which of the many species this would be, I don't know, but likely a common one like the Onion Thrips (Thrips ...


1

Its Vachellia farnesiana Wikipedia link Common name - Sweet Acacia, दुर्गंध खैर durgandh khair (In India)


0

Nezara viridula, Green Vegetable Bug (and other names). Probably fifth instar, as the body is mostly green. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nezara_viridula Found by searching images using the terms: green stink bug with four rows of yellow dots Photo by Charles Schurch Lewallen, under Creative Commons license. Found at https://bugguide.net/node/view/8819


1

I am not 100% sure on this, but it looks very like a diatom. These are a range of very diverse unicellular algae found world-wide in soil and water environments (salt and fresh). There are a huge number of species (also genera, families etc.). The reasons I think that this is a diatom are that it has what appears to be a thick transparent wall (photos 2 and ...


1

You haven't told us where you live, but it must be somewhere in the Eastern USA, as your plant appears to be the native Hydrangea arborescens. More info available here and many other places on the internet.


3

Not a hornet at all, nor any Hymenoptera but rather a Diptera. As you suggest, the eyes as well as the wing structure give it away. It looks like a horse fly, possibly Tabanus sudeticus or Tabanus bovinus based on the large size and coloration in the abdomen.


1

The changes in the bark makes it look like Eucalyptus melliodora (Yellow box). Locations recorded are in this link. http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Eucalyptus~melliodora Some photos of this tree can be seen at: http://www.nccma.vic.gov.au/sites/default/files/publications/nccma-41853_-_box-...


0

It is difficult to be sure without clearer pictures, but my best guess would be a female (and/or immature) Brown-headed cowbird. This is based on the heavy conical beak, my guess at the size, the overall grey-brown coloration, dark eye, dark beak, dark legs, and the faint suggestion of a line behind the eye. In addition, this is a common species in many ...


2

Given the rough shape I lean towards an ectoparasitic isopod. I have no idea which one of the roughly 2700 species it might be, but I would guess from a quick search that it probably belongs to the families Cymothoidae or Gnathiidae as these seem to be the more common and well described (at least they have more complete Wikipedia entries, wheras the other ...


15

This is one of the numerous species of tern. They are common birds of the seashore and rivers world-wide. The characteristic forked tail and the black cap on the head is what gives it away. It is hard to say for sure given the chromatic aberration altering the colours, but this is likely to be either from the genus Sterna (particularly the Arctic tern or the ...


0

This is a planthopper nymph. These are a quite diverse group of insects found worldwide. Which one you have is open to further answers, and will be based on your locality and the species of plants and insects in that location. The furry "tail" and the fish-like mouth-parts/head give it away.


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