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I think it's fair warning that these little guys may be infesting your products. The link I used as my source for this information has more detailed info on how to check and what kind of cigarette beetle can ride around in there! https://bonaccordpestcontrol.co.uk/service/beetle-pest-control-uk/


17

Given the size and thin/elongated ilia as well as the urban location, I think a domestic cat and/or a raccoon are likely candidates. I'm leaning toward cat. Cat pelvis: VCA Hospitals Ventral view of domestic cat pelvis; Source: BoneID Raccoon Pelvis Anterior view of raccoon pelvis; Source: BoneID I'm not an expert in differentiating these two ...


6

That's likely a raccoon and a dead fish (salmon, perhaps). For the animal on the left: notice the ringed tail, foot anatomy, and lighter foot color, and variable (light/dark) fur color: University of Arizona Furbearer Conservation University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Note: Since you mentioned opossums, I include the above to show the vast ...


5

From the location of purchase, conical shape, color, and size, the tooth is that of a sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus). Sperm whales have 17-29 teeth in the lower jaw that range 3-8 inches (see Perrin et al., 2009). Their teeth were most often used as scrimshaw, and many can be seen at the Nantucket Whaling Museum. Just as an FYI, under the Endangered ...


2

The size (~2 inches), broad "quadrate" head, and long posterior abdomen leads me to believe this is a relative large larva of a Predaceous Diving Beetle (family Dytiscidae). The larvae are sometimes called "water tigers" due to their large mandibles and voracity as aquatic predators. One possible example: Dytiscus marginalis; Sources:...


6

From these photos, the main features to go on are the dorsal black and red markings, the coloured bands on the legs, the white dots on the abdomen, and the shape of the body. These features does match well with this species, which is common in southern North America: Milkweed Assassin Bug (Zelus longipes) The bite from this species is supposed to be very ...


1

This appears to be the exuvia (i.e., molted) pupa of some sort of moth. One Australian species with a similar-looking and sized pupa is the bardee or rain moth (Trictena atripalpis; or Abantiades atripalpis): Credit: Dianne Clark ; Source: Coffs Harbour Butterfly House See another similar looking (and coincidentally 8cm long) specimen here:


6

Short answer I think this could possibly be the nymph of some sort of cockroach. Long answer I initially thought these were aphids of some type due to their pear-like body shapes and the small pair of upright projections coming off their backsides (possibly cornicles?). However, zooming into some of your more-detailed specimens in the 2nd photo ...


-1

I think it's a thatched barnacle (Semibalanus cariosus). The iNaturalist app would also be a helpful tool in which to ask this question.


0

The green, narrow body suggests this is indeed a katydid. The red antennae, red eyes, and small, red-lined wings looks like the green form of a Paracyrtophyllus robustus (Central Texas leaf katydid) nymph. Credit: Mike Quinn ; Source: Bugguide.net Source: Austin Bug Collection


1

If you look at the wings, they look partially formed and hard -- this is indicative of this being a nymph of some type of hemipteran. (The developing are sometimes called "wing pads"). One group that comes to mind is the family Miridae since some species have ant-mimic nymphs. One possibility (well, one jumping off point) is Miris striatus * ...


2

Body shape, coloration (especially lateral yellow stripe) and location all lead me to think this is some species of Uropeltis snake, all of which are endemic to India. Wikipedia lists 25 species in this genus, and at least some species are only differentiated by closely examining the number of scales or size of shields. One common species is Uropeltis ...


1

I agree this look like images I've seen of Zelus species nymphs, and I have no reason to immediately rule out Z. renardii. Though, nymphs of many of the Reduviidae look quite similar to me, and I feel like I've never seen a comprehensive guide to thoroughly/methodically distinguishing nymphs (especially from an internet photo). This is made more complicated ...


1

Looks like a type of legume called a senna, though I do not know for certain which species -- see below for a pretty good guess! Things that stand out about your specimen: Most prominent are the erect/many-flowered yellow inflorescences, which are called racemes. You can see narrow green seed pods below your inflorescences as well -- these appear to be ...


2

My guess is the ocellated skink (Chalcides ocellatus). Credit: Adel Ibrahim ; Source: The Reptile database The species is names for its black/white ocellated, or eye-like, patched scales, similar to the ones seen in you specimen. C. ocellatus also would match your size (15-30 cm) and your location (generalist, including rocky). It is found throughout the ...


2

These are larvae of some species of wood-boring beetle. It is quite possible you've had multiple species eating your various species of wood. Many species of boring insects have white, segments, worm-like larvae. I do not know for certain what species you have, but size, phenology (e.g., timing of metamorphosis/emergence), type of wood infected, and time ...


1

With the limited info and only a side image (top/bottom photos more helpful for ID), it's hard to pinpoint a specific species. To complicate matters, Manaaki Whenua Landcare research suggests: Over 90% of New Zealand spiders are endemic, the rest are natural introductions through windborne or human activities. The species we frequently see around are houses ...


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