54 votes

What is the benefit of fever during infections?

Fever is a trait observed in warm and cold-blooded vertebrates that has been conserved for hundreds of millions of years (Evans, 2015). Elevated body temperature stimulates the body's immune ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 52.4k
7 votes

What is the benefit of fever during infections?

Fever normally under hypothalamic heat center's control which stays at limbic system of brain . Hypothalamus sets its own set point 36.4-37.2 in healthy peoples by some molecules named exogenous and ...
sinankzlyr's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Why is it cool near the trees?

Why it can feel chilly close to trees in the evening: Water coming out of Stomata vaporises, reducing the surrounding temperature. There is normally no direct sunlight reaching the ground beneath the ...
Ebbinghaus's user avatar
  • 2,603
6 votes

How much heat can a human sustain?

Depends highly on the amount of steam in the room. Most if the heat energy does not come from the air, but from the steam that is condensing on your skin. I can tell from my own experience that I ...
Maaki's user avatar
  • 61
5 votes

Why does breathing increase in higher temperatures?

As you can see on the diagram below, oxygen solubulity in water drops by increasing temperature, so your fish has to breath more to get the same amount of oxygen. ref You can find more info about ...
inf3rno's user avatar
  • 4,460
5 votes

How to convert skin temperature to core temperature?

The measurement of core temperature (it is the right term*) is easy using an invasive method. It is also reliable since: Core temperature is easy to measure and temperatures are relatively ...
SoFar67's user avatar
  • 111
4 votes

What causes plants in the prunus genus to reach anthesis?

Here’s how it works. Every morning when the sun breaks over the horizon — no matter what time of year it is — a clock starts ticking inside the trees. After a specific number of hours, the plants’ ...
Sartoaster11's user avatar
4 votes

Why does breathing increase in higher temperatures?

In3mo informed about oxygen content varying with temperature, and another factor is the fish metabolic rate: Standard Metabolic Rate (SMR) is the metabolic benchmark in fish. It is the metabolic ...
bandybabboon's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

How long can Legionella survive at 60°C?

Usually cell death would follow first order kinetics. $$X=X_0e^{-kt}$$ where $X$ is the number of cells at time $t$, $X_0$ is the initial number of cells and $k$ is the death rate constant. You can ...
WYSIWYG's user avatar
  • 35.6k
4 votes

Why don't cats have to pant?

Transpiring and panting are ways to regulate body temperature. When sweat evaporates, it cools the skin, and panting releases heat through the mouth. Horses, humans and even plants transpire for this ...
AliceD's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

If you have water on you, does it *actually* cool or down, or do you just *feel* cold?

When your wet skin experiences air flow over it, water will evaporate. Evaporation causes cooling, as energy is transferred from the remaining water molecules to the ones that evaporate - energy in ...
GrumpyMammoth's user avatar
3 votes

Are there organisms which have compartments of different body temperature?

As @kmm suggested, the scrotum is a common "compartment" that is commonly a few degrees lower than the core temperature. A key concept is the core temperature. That's only in the core. I'm not sure ...
anongoodnurse's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Why does sunburn cause fever?

Here is a good article on the topic. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003227.htm But it's most likely due to the fact that a sun burn is an actual burn on the skin that can cause ...
Mr Hons's user avatar
  • 56
3 votes

Do animals like Seals feel cold on their skin?

Humans (and other animals) do not feel temperature; when we “feel cold” we actually sense that our body starts to lose heat (we feel the heat transfer). Pinnipeds, notably phocid seals (True seals or ...
Heloise Frouin-Mouy's user avatar
2 votes

Why humans have the temperature they have?

If I had to guess, the reason human have the body temperature we do is because the ancestors of placental mammals had that body temperature. You will notice that all placental mammals have nearly the ...
JayCkat's user avatar
  • 2,926
2 votes
Accepted

Do action potentials cause the neuron to heat up as well as its environment?

While it is possible that action potentials themselves result in waste heat, there are other processes within the neuron likely to contribute much more to energy lost as heat. The action potential ...
bpedit's user avatar
  • 1,351
2 votes

In Japan, the official average body temperature is 36.0 °C. Why so different from that of Europe?

This study states a 0.35 degrees difference between a japanese and a malaysian, 36.95 and 37.3, it's alot. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3929238/ The following study states states a 0....
bandybabboon's user avatar
  • 10.4k
2 votes
Accepted

Does thermal shock apply to human bones?

No is the answer to this - stop a think for a little bit. If this were the case, there would be many thousands of such incidents observed every year, and no-one would ever do such things as plunge ...
bob1's user avatar
  • 12k
1 vote

Breeding mosquitoes at lower temperature

Check "breeding temperature" and similar obscure phrases for the search. There's a study on physical aspect of mosquitos bred in cold, they perhaps didn't note any significant metabolism change, you ...
bandybabboon's user avatar
  • 10.4k
1 vote
Accepted

Trick fruit trees into flowering later in the spring

The Principles of Fruit-Growing By Liberty Bailey 1898 (from page 92):
User1974's user avatar
  • 852
1 vote

Trick fruit trees into flowering later in the spring

You are on the right track, but snow is the wrong way. When the snow is around it insulates the ground. Soil surface temps stabilize at close to freezing. Instead, do the reverse. Remove, or ...
Sherwood Botsford's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

why do we tighten out muscles against cold?

Consider most animals instinctively recoil from unpleasant sensations. Resisting this often involves tightening the muscles. Think about the last time you had to get a shot or pull a splinter out of ...
John's user avatar
  • 14.7k
1 vote

Does pouring water on your skin affect the evaporation process and heat loss?

Drenching your head and face with cool water will both directly cool your skin (because cool water is colder than you) and contribute to evaporative cooling. Your skin doesn't care if the water that ...
De Novo's user avatar
  • 8,791
1 vote

How do non-human apes cool their body temperature in warm climates?

Some of the tactics include: _ More frequent breaths. _ Sweat more. _ Loss of skin moisture. You can read here for more details: https://physoc.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1113/jphysiol.1976....
Tri Le's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote

How do non-human apes cool their body temperature in warm climates?

First they have less cooling needs than us, shady forests are cooler than sunlit savannah, they also are not as active, especially the larger ones, at least not in the hottest parts of the day. keep ...
John's user avatar
  • 14.7k
1 vote
Accepted

Dry Bulb Temperature VS Dew Point, which one is most relevant to insects?

Insect development and activity are strongly associated with dry-bulb temperature. Development rate is usually predicted using degree-days (Links here: http://ipm.ucanr.edu/WEATHER/ddconcepts.html and ...
Bugmo's user avatar
  • 316
1 vote
Accepted

What is the fundamental reason for death from too high or low internal temperature?

As mentioned in the comments, half of your question is answered elsewhere. Generally you are right, different processes change at different rates. Blood viscosity changes. Some complex systems, such ...
forest's user avatar
  • 297

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