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23

Your best bet is the Terminologia Anatomica, which is the international standard for anatomical terminology. The 1998 edition is freely available. It lists only a few named tendons though, which is consistent with my experience as an anatomist: very few tendons are named separately from the muscles to which they are connected. Central tendon of the ...


13

The FMA lists 705 tendons, but note that it includes separate terms for left and right instances. As @kmm says, many of these simply shadow the list of skeletal muscles (and is likely incomplete). You can browse the list on OLS, or if you want to extract a table you can query this SPARQL endpoint, just type in the query here: SELECT DISTINCT ?x ?v0 WHERE { ...


4

A tendon usually connects a muscle to a bone, but not always. According to InnerBody, the diaphragm muscle originates at the lumbar vertebra, lower ribs and sternum and inserts to the central tendon. The central tendon — a flat aponeurosis made of dense collagen fibers — acts as the tough insertion point of the muscles. So, the central tendon acts as ...


2

I suspect that you are correct, "subpatellar tendon" is referring to the patellar ligament. Although it is small, in the image below, (3) is the tibial tuberosity and (5) is the patella. (4) which is labeled "subpatellar tendon" is between the two. The only structure between them is the patellar ligament. So, I think this is what it meant (though in 20 years ...


2

The article you linked is interesting, but as @Charles E. Grant mentioned in the comments, it’s not particularly reasonable to compare a non-tear repetitive stress injury (like epicondylitis) to a full muscle tear. Non-tear repetitive stress injuries persist because the offending frequent motion doesn’t stop. A muscle tear, however, will recruit an ...


2

You’re correct that the gluteus minimus is redundant in function with the gluteus medius, but an isolated gluteus minimus tear still causes functional problems because of the associated inflammatory response and subsequent pain deemed “greater trochanteric pain syndrome,” as the greater trochanter is the insertion site for hip abductor muscles like the ...


1

{4} has a similar micrograph as yours but with some labels: with the caption: Figure 1.2: Tendon microstructure of healthy tendons: nuclei of tenocytes are darker in color and vascularization does not disrupt collagen arrays. arrays http://www.onlineveterinaryanatomy.net/content/tendon-histology-labelled (mirror) {5} presents both a longitudinal (a) ...


1

As far as I know there is no clear scientific evidence on whether and at which stage of a tendon injury one should use NSAID. Here is the conclusion of a systematic review from Cochrane {1}: There remains limited evidence from which to draw firm conclusions about the benefits or harms of topical or oral NSAIDs in treating lateral elbow pain. Although data ...


1

The tendon and muscle attachment are not the same. In your example, both are affected, so they are described separately. A muscle extends into a tendon and this into an enthesis - an actual attachment site where the muscle is attached to the bone (PubMed).


1

{1} greatly answers the question. Regarding the insertion location (lateral view): Note that unlike the gluteus minimus insertion, the gluteus medius insertion can also be viewed anterolaterally: Table 2 contains more detailed insertion location data: Regarding the insertion area: Gluteus maximus: Average Area, mm^2 (95% CI): 473.4 (381.0, 565.8). ...


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