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6

The thing that I think biologically interesting about this question has perhaps not been emphasized sufficiently in the answers so far which document that the term is still in use. This is why the term is still in use. As the poster states: I’ve seen “polycistronic” being applied to prokaryotic mRNA in old textbooks, but I’ve rarely stumbled upon this in ...


4

@iayork's answer provides a great approach to examining this question. I just want to corroborate it by using a slightly different approach. A Google Scholar search for "polycistronic" limited to results since 2015 provides >200 hits. Some examples include: Gordon, S.P., Tseng, E., Salamov, A., Zhang, J., Meng, X., Zhao, Z., Kang, D., Underwood, J., ...


7

Yes, it's still used. If you search Pubmed for "polycistronic", it offers you a chart showing the counts of the term by year (top right). Downloading the CSV and making a chart shows that it's never been a very common term, but it's still used. I suspect, but don't have time to check, that if you were to divide the use of the term by the number of ...


4

A prototype virus may or may not be the first isolated virus of a group. It's essentially the same as a "reference" virus -- in fact, the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) uses the terms interchangeably, as in the Hepeviridae Study Group which has a column entitled "Prototype/Reference Strain". In many cases the reference virus is the ...


0

"Constitutional" refers to the physical state of the concerned individual (Merriam-Webster). In biology, it most probably means a trait that is not pathological or environment induced. This is in the context of size of babies: Small for gestational age (SGA) can occur following a pathological process or may represent constitutionally small fetuses. ...


4

As sort of a "teach to fish" answer, let's approach how to answer a question like this: Google Scholar is a pretty good index of scientific literature: good enough for this purpose. If you search: "disorientation event" -turtle you will return all results that use the specific phrase "disorientation event" except those that mention turtles. You can also ...


3

I'm only familiar with the bird research and it is not a commonly used term in ornithology. Birds use multiple methods for navigation which include the sun, stars and the earth's magnetic field. When biologists talk about birds becoming disoriented (usually by magnetic fields or they could appear to be disoriented after a fallout event, due to a hurricane ...


5

Retting could be a valid term. But I think that the term "skeletonization" is more common. For instance here is a link to the University of Arizona showing how you would take a flower or a leaf and remove all components, leaving the veins: Skeletonization I think that "retting" is confined to the industrial harvesting of plants like flax. I would use the ...


1

Adjustment = a small alteration or movement made to achieve a desired fit, appearance, or result; the process of adapting or becoming used to a new situation (Google Dictionary). Adjustment is a very general term; it doesn't mean anything specific in biology or other sciences and it can cover all the terms you've mentioned: adaptation, acclimatization and ...


-2

Was just researching your exact same question. Self-replicate is the closest I could find or think of... but it's a very general verb, not even biology specific. e.g. Please don't self-replicate, I'm already having trouble with just one of you -- said the programmer to his memory gobbling AI program. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-replication


1

I have heard the process that leads to this called retting.


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