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19

This is the nest of a Mud dauber, also known as Mud wasp. This was possibly made by a Black and Yellow Mud dauber based on the following information. The nest of the black and yellow mud dauber is a simple, one-cell, urn-shaped nest. 1* As for expecting something coming out of it? I doubt it, as the nests are sealed after depositing an egg. After ...


16

This is some species of ichneumon wasp. The ichneumon wasps are parasitoid wasps in the order Hymenoptera. They commonly parasitize other invertebrates, especially larvae and pupae of Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, and Lepidoptera. Specifically, this appears to be Dolichomitus irritator. Photo credit: Thomas wilson Here's another specimen of the same ...


14

These are European paper wasps. (They look very similar to yellowjacket wasps but you can notice the antennae; they are brown here whereas they are black in case of yellowjackets. There are other subtle differences too.) See this post on Gardening & Landscaping stackexchange about getting rid of wasps. (This part is probably not really on-topic here ...


12

First of all, it isn't a wasp, but a true bug. After a long search in the databases about Hong-Kong's insects, I found that it is a red cotton stainer. Wikipedia says "Dysdercus cingulatus occurs in Sri Lanka, northeastern India, Bangladesh, Thailand, the Philippines, Sumatra, Borneo, Papua New Guinea and northern Australia". iNaturalist.org has a number of ...


8

That is a horntail, family Siricidae. https://www.insectimages.org/browse/taxthumb.cfm?fam=455 They are a family of sawflies. Not technically wasps, but they are Hymenoptera.


8

It's some sort of potter wasp/mason wasp (Eumeninae). The spiders are paralyzed and brought there as food for its larvae. Here is an example of an opened nest I found on Bugguide.net that looks similar to yours: I don't know if it's possible to say what species it is from the nest.


7

This is likely a honeycomb created by some species of honey bee. A beekeeper (Jessie Brown) from New Mexico shared to her blog the following photos of a "free form" bee hive some of her bees created: Photo credit: Nina Dubois In that instance (as well as the one mentioned here and pictured below), the beekeeper moved some "burr comb" to a new location ...


6

Yeah, she looks dangerous doesn't she. However, the 'stinger' is used for ovispositing eggs in wood. These wasps do not sting. This species is called Pigeon Tremex Horntail, Tremex Columba. Nice pictures and very interesting information on the website below, however the images have copyrights, so I can't include them here. http://bugeric.blogspot.com/2012/...


5

This looks like a European hornet Vespa crabro to me. Wasp-like appearance, red on head and thorax and base of the abdomen. And the legs are red/dark, not yellow. Picture from wikipedia Hornets can be aggressive, especially if you come near the nest. Usually, European hornets are actually not really interested in people (unlike other wasps). But if there ...


5

The wasp is a Ropalidia marginata The assailant is a greater banded hornet . There is a video of one attacking a wasp nest here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPLRpEkNv8Q Hornets can attack wasp and bee hives and decimate them. In europe there is an invasive species of hornet from japan which is twice as big as the european hornet. The abdomen of ...


4

According to multiple reports (here, here and here), a 7m (22ft) paper wasp nest was found in an abandoned home in San Sebastian de La Gomera on the island of Tenerife (~100km off the shore from Morocco)!! The nest was estimated to be home to over 22,000 wasps! The picture is included below: This nest broke the previous world record, a nest discovered in ...


3

This specimen is most likely a Polistes sp. from the Vespidae-family. Some Polistes species are sometimes referred to as paper wasps. Coloring is not the primary criterion for identification here. The folded wings leave no doubt that it is a wasp from the Vespidae family (which excludes the Great Black Wasp, as suggested in the comments). Since there is ...


3

It depends on species and situation. There are a lot of different solitary wasps, the kind you are referring to are parasitic wasps, that lay their eggs in or on a host for the larvae to feed on before they pupate to reach the final stage of their lifetime. Some larvae that consume a host in groups take as little as twelve days to consume their host and ...


3

This looks like it's a female Pelecinid parasitic wasp (see this page for an overview of the family in the western hemisphere); from your location the species is either Pelecinus polyturator or Pelecinus dichrous (all of BugGuide's images are of the former, that being the one also found in the United States).


3

Looks like this is a European wool carder bee (Anthidium manicatum) More precisely a female, judging by the round end of the abdomen. Information regarding the nest it was found in: These bees construct their nests in preexisting cavities, using the trichomes of wooly plants. Females use their mandibles, which are sharply toothed, to remove ...


2

Yes it is ! If you look closely at the wing patterns, they are characteristic of the Ichneumonidae family, as you can see below*. This family contains thousands of species which all are parasitoids. Species identification is very tricky for this family, but the patterns on the abdomen (2nd and 3d strips are yellow, the others are black, yellow spot at the ...


1

Stay vigilant. As you've noticed, once wasps get established in an area, they'll reproduce and spread out. Continue to watch for and eradicate nests. Hardware stores will sell a variety of chemical sprays, but a mix of liquid soap (dish detergent) and water works just as well. Use wasp traps to prevent wasps from establishing new nests in your area. You ...


1

Ok, my bad. Should've googled better. It seems that it might be a common wasp aka Vespula vulgaris. It's said that the colour of the nest is caused by material being collected from the rotten tree trunks. See the identified sample: It's said that they don't make nests in houses too often that's why I'm not accustomed to the look of the nest.


1

It's not true that all stingers have barbs. Wasps, and many other species, don't have barbed stingers, and therefore they can afford to sting you repeatedly without being killed. Worker bees, on the contrary, have a barbed stinger that gets stuck in your skin. Although wasps have a more powerful venom than bees, with bees usually the venom sack remains ...


1

It looks to me as Potter Wasp (or mason wasps), the Eumeninae, are a cosmopolitan wasp group presently treated as a subfamily of Vespidae, but sometimes recognized in the past as a separate family, Eumenidae. Since there is no more info provided and image is not sharp I cannot be 100% sure.


1

Yes, all female wasps are expected to have venom. In the case of social wasps, which I am inferring is what stung you, all female wasps are equally potent as they're morphologically the same. [This opens the question of how could you say this was a queen wasp.] The only difference between a wasp worker and a queen is that a worker is forced to fly around and ...


1

This is similar to the seahorse problem, in that it requires a distinctly non-mammalian perspective. Parasitoid Wasps, Natural Enemies of Insects provides a more in-depth explanation. Existing wasp strategies may illustrate the possible transitional forms. It is not a linear transition: all of these have branched off and there are multiple parasitic ...


1

There are many scientific methods for that which are widely used in animal behavior studies, specifically in honey bees. Read this this. If you search you can find similar for mice and rats also :P


1

Social wasp larvae hatch from an overhanging egg, and they grow up through a series of skin moults, typically 5 in number. The shed skins accumulate terminally behind their pointed anus, where the egg chorion peduncule remain. These wasps have a special body construction and skin texture (e.g. abdominal lobes, numerous spikes) that allows for pressing ...


1

What I can say from observing an abandoned nest, larvae have a connection to the chamber ceiling. I don't know what it is, exactly, but looks like some form of glue.


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