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17

Given the size and thin/elongated ilia as well as the urban location, I think a domestic cat and/or a raccoon are likely candidates. I'm leaning toward cat. Cat pelvis: VCA Hospitals Ventral view of domestic cat pelvis; Source: BoneID Raccoon Pelvis Anterior view of raccoon pelvis; Source: BoneID I'm not an expert in differentiating these two ...


6

You're right that there have been few playback studies assessing the response of sperm whales to sperm whale clicks. A couple of studies have shown a response (reduced foraging, returning to surface[1,2]) when killer whale vocalizations are played in the presence of sperm whales. As an acoustician focused on odontocete echolocation clicks, I field a lot of ...


6

There has been a study / rescue attempt of a group of male sperm whales a few decades ago, where female sperm whale codas (a type of rhythmic communication clicks) where played from an underwater transducer in order to entice the males and lure them from an area of confined waters and into deeper water. According to this study1, the playback was not ...


6

This article from the humane society suggests that the male-female ratio in wild turkeys is generally 1:1 1. It's likely that nothing 'happens' to the male turkeys. Possibly you and your family may be miscounting some males as females; you mention in your comment the big tail feathers, but both sexes have fairly long tail feathers so that may not always be ...


5

An incomplete digestive system is one in which there is only one opening. In our digestive system food is taken in by one opening (our mouth), the nutrients extracted and the remains are ejected by another opening (our anus). In these lower organisms the food is taken in by one opening, the nutrients extracted and the remains are ejected through the same ...


4

I am not a wolf expert, unfortunately, but was able to find an article focused on just this question with grey wolf packs (1). The article studies relatedness via microsatellite locations in the DNA of mated pairs, and found that incest is seemingly avoided when possible, which supports your Wikipedia finding. Another article on Ethiopian wolves came to ...


4

Your question falls into an area of study known as allometry. It is generally believed that brain size must increase as body size increases1,2. This relationship has been demonstrated in fish 3,4, including carp. This phenomenon is also seen in other (non-mammalian) vertebrates including the Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus)5. This continued growth is ...


2

This is a really interesting question. Based on what I'm reading online the answer is no, not as far as we know. Bears, mountain lions, and other species have been noted to follow tracks but this is commonly thought to be due to following the smell an animal leaves behind, not the visual cue itself. This similar question on Quora has a discussion of this ...


2

The size (~2 inches), broad "quadrate" head, and long posterior abdomen leads me to believe this is a relative large larva of a Predaceous Diving Beetle (family Dytiscidae). The larvae are sometimes called "water tigers" due to their large mandibles and voracity as aquatic predators. One possible example: Dytiscus marginalis; Sources:...


1

I think this article provides some relevant information for your question. It specifies that the rate of twins is high (50%) in captive pandas, and low elsewhere. The article mentions that there is a genetic component to twin predisposition (which is true for humans as well, see here), but that the primary reason is the technology used for captive pandas to ...


1

This appears to be the exuvia (i.e., molted) pupa of some sort of moth. One Australian species with a similar-looking and sized pupa is the bardee or rain moth (Trictena atripalpis; or Abantiades atripalpis): Credit: Dianne Clark ; Source: Coffs Harbour Butterfly House See another similar looking (and coincidentally 8cm long) specimen here:


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