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29

I think one of the important things to understand in thinking about this case is that it just hasn't been that long, generationally. Escobar imported the hippos in the late 1980s. Hippos reach sexual maturity at an average of about 7.5 years old for males and 9.5 years for females, space births about 2 years apart, and live for 40-50 years. Thirty years out,...


8

They often do. You hear a lot about all of the times invasive species succeed in invading a new habitat, because there is a surviving population around for researchers to observe. There are lots of cases where new species are introduced to an environment in a single event but fail to survive. Rabbits and foxes were repeatedly introduced to Australia, only ...


7

There are some references on this: Castelblanco-Martinez, 2021 is a recent one. There doesn't seem to be much doubt at least that hippopotami are thriving as an invasive species. I didn't see anything on the genetics, but I will give in to the temptation to speculate even if perhaps I shouldn't. There are some advantages that are likely working against the ...


6

To focus on the inbreeding: Inbreeding in itself is not a factor that would make species die out. Rather, inbreeding increases the risk of genetic diseases, if the deleterious alleles are already present. Three females do not represent such a large genetic pool, so that inbreeding would still occur. Given that there have been only few generations since the ...


3

It is true that African lions have recently become more prone to inbreeding, largely due to human actions (reasons include limited dispersal and at least temporarily reduced pride sizes). see here Generally though, lions likely avoid mating with close relatives innately as most animal species do. see e.g. here A few things about the social structures of ...


2

Animals don't die out from any causes related to themselves, their breeding, or anything like that. They die out either because their ecological niche goes away (climate change, etc.), because something else outcompetes them in that ecological niche (introduced fish outcompeting cichlids, for example), or because an external force exterminates them (...


2

Animals muscle does atrophy and gain depending on use. First animal muscle does atrophy if the animal is too sessile. However in nature it is hard to be sessile. Consider how physically fit hunter gather humans are in terms of the cardiovascular systems. If you constantly active you don't need to "exercise" to build muscle you are getting loads of ...


2

Since you're a new contributor, I'm going to go ahead and answer this despite the flaws in the question that have caused it to be at -4 when I write this answer (skip to the last paragraph to see what I have to say about that). The major reason the answer isn't more obvious is that your assumptions about how long plants and animals have been around is ...


1

Some individuals being unfit to survive, doesn’t necessarily lead to extinction, it leads to removing the traits that make them unfit to survive from the breeding pool. From a species POV this is a good thing. This leading to extinction happens when so many individuals have the trait, that those without it can’t can’t find a breeding partner to have ...


1

A good number of vegetables and fruits have >90% water contents; this includes cucumber, watermelon, etc. Even oranges, broccoli etc. have >80%. So it would not be hard to have enough water intake if the veggie/fruit/smoothie diet is not restricted to particular fruits or veggies. Slightly less detailed, but more reliable source agrees:


1

Although the OP might no longer be active, I'm comming back to this question, because there is a new study on this released in "Soft Matter". With simulations Yang et al., 2021, describe how corners of these almost perfect cubes might be formed. From the abstract: Using histology and tensile testing, we discover that the cross-section of the ...


1

The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) has been reported to need at least 156 ± 22 years reach to sexual maturity1. This is also thought to be the vertebrate with the longest lifespan. Reference 1: Nielsen, J., Hedeholm, R. B., Heinemeier, J., Bushnell, P. G., Christiansen, J. S., Olsen, J., ... & Steffensen, J. F. (2016). Eye lens radiocarbon ...


1

This article provides general facts about Tuataras, one of which is: Tuataras reproduce slowly. They take 10-20 years to reach sexual maturity. Males can mate every year, but females breed every two to five years. It takes the female between one and three years to provide eggs with yolk, and up to seven months to form the shell. Then it takes an additional ...


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