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27

This looks a lot like a double-barred finch (Taeniopygia bichenovii). Your note about this being an "owl-like" bird is supported by it's less common name, the "owl finch", so named for the dark ring around the face. Source: Wikipedia; Credit: Glen Fergus If this is in fact the bird you saw, you're right that it's not native to your country (or continent ...


9

Black herons (Egretta ardesiaca) can overlap their wing tips in front of them while doing what is known as canopy feeding.


5

This appears to be a bird mite (or possibly rat mite) in the genus Ornithonyssus of the parasitic family Macronyssidae. Credit: user Aewills on bugguide.com Identification: From Central Exterminating Co.: The mites are distinguished from most other common, structural species by the very long legs and very long mouthparts. These long, pointed ...


5

I think the question's phrasing is arguably a little wobbly, typically as to the nature of what someone would mean by the term "reptile". But I think you understood what your teacher was expecting. I agree with you, answer is B. Reptilia is a clade (clade = monophyletic group) that encompasses all species that we traditionally classify as reptiles + all ...


4

This is an instar (nymph) of a shield or stink bug (order Hemiptera, family [Pentatomidae])(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentatomidae). This appears to be similar to the 2nd (or possibly 3rd) instar of Halyomorpha halys. European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization; Credit: Matteo Maspero UTIA suggests the 2nd instar begins to develop an ...


4

This is probably a nymphal stage of a stink bug (aka shield bug). Based on the roundness of your specimens, I'd suspect that they represent possibly the 1st or 2nd instar development stage. I am unsure of the species currently, though I suspect this is an image of the adult (wrongfully labeled as a "bed bug" at its source): Source: Shutterstock I will ...


3

The body shape does seem to indicate it's some kind of heron/egret (12 species, of which, have been previously found in Michigan [according to Wikipedia]). The seemingly large size from your picture (please edit with actual or best approximation of size), the tufted feathers on the head, white face, and the start of a black line on the anterior edge of the ...


3

No, this is not a Brown Recluse. There are several reasons for saying that, among them the fact that it's outside; it's hanging on a screen, and it doesn't look at all like a Brown Recluse - (Recluses don't have a rectangular cephalothorax "head end", and they have a bulbous abdomen, not that pointy-ended one this spider has). As for what it is, there are ...


3

This is a nymph of a shield bug in the Tessaratomidae family, commonly called tassarotimids (or sometimes "giant shield bugs" due to typically being 1.5 - 4.5 cm long). According to Wikipedia: They are mostly found in tropical Africa, Asia, and Oceania though a few species can be found in the Neotropics and Australia. There are about 240 species known ...


2

Be warned that these are just best guesses - as you said yourself, these aren't great images for identification as they appear to be simple drawings: 1) this looks a lot like Aurelia aurita - though the lack of any internal patterning in the drawing makes me think perhaps otherwise. image source: https://www.leisurepro.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/...


2

This is indeed a true bug (Hemipteran) in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha. As Arthur Frost said in his comment, exact identification is difficult for those of us on the other side of the world. However, a fortuitous series of internet rabbit holes may have led me to a very similar looking specimen. Homoeocerus striicornis and Homoeocerus angulatus appear ...


2

My comment above is actually likely wrong. Instead, I think this is possibly the larva of the rose-myrtle lappet moth (Trabala vishnou) in the Lasiocampidae. (It may also be the larva of the closely-related roseapple caterpillar, Trabala pallida -- see here and here). I don't know this group of moths at all, but a series of failed "Lymantriinae" searches ...


2

These bugs are a type of hexapod called springtails (subclass Collembola). Springtails are often very tiny and hard to see without a lens, so I have to say you did a good job grabbing a fairly detailed picture of this one. Specifically, your specimen appears to be some species in the order Entomobryomorpha. According to Wikipedia: They can be best ...


1

Yes, in virtually every way. In terms of pairwise distances, measured in percentages, humans and coelacanth are closer to one-another than coelacanth would be to any ray-finned fish. In terms of individual genes, there would be genes that humans and coelacanth share with their common ancestor, but are not found in any ray-finned fish. Remember, humans are ...


1

Birds of flight were the original inspiration for the design of a machine that could fly and carry a person aloft, hence it's not surprising that the aerodynamics of avian flight and aircraft have much in common. Specifically, they both consume mass as the source of energy to maintain flight; jet fuel or gasoline in the case of airplanes, and stored body fat ...


1

This appears to be the larva of a drain fly (aka moth fly; family Psychodidae). Top left is larva; Source: YourWildlife.org; Credit: Matt Bertone You can use a dichotimous key to help you ID to family. For example, from Bouchard et al. (2004)+: Body cyclindrical; non-leathery integument... Head capsule fully visible and completely separated from thorax ...


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