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Looks like the Large Indian civet. Notice the size and the fur coloration pattern on the neck. From wikipedia: The large Indian civet ranges from Nepal, northeast India, Bhutan, Bangladesh to Myanmar, Thailand, the Malay peninsula and Singapore to Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam and China.[1] Looks like it is found in eastern parts of Bangladesh including ...


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Based on the size and location that appears to be a Common mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus). The four toes visible on the front foot are also consistent with this identification. This species is found throughout eastern North America and you can learn more about from the Canadian herpetological society and iNaturalist.


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Judging from the small limbs and overall size, it appears to be a large aquatic salamander, similar to Necturus maculosus, the mudpuppy. These have a pretty cosmopolitan distribution in North America, including into southern Canada. I can't tell from the photo if it has external gills.


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Its mostly due to different forms of predation. Longer jaws are deeper and can reach farther around a prey item, it also increases the chances of catching a moving target in the jaws becasue the area the jaw covers is larger, all things being equal it should always be favored but things are rarely equal, everything has a cost. It is common to see longer ...


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There is a large variety of pupil shapes and ability to contract pupils in animals. The vast majority of animals can contract their pupils, including goats and mongooses. Prey animals tend to have horizontally slit pupil, like goats. Mongooses (carnivores) seem to be an exception in that respect. Here is a picture of a sheep's pupil fully dilated and fully ...


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