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6

Not as far as I can tell. The closest example I can find is within-season pair bonding in copperhead snakes (defined as a male-female pair remaining together for some time, in this case defined as longer than a quarter of the breeding season). Smith and Schuett (2015)'s abstract says: Pair-bonding between sexes is common in vertebrate taxa, yet it has been ...


4

Though not strictly pathogenic in nature, Opossums (Didelphis virginiana) are well known to be able to recover from broad range of deadly toxins/venoms due to -- at least in part -- lethal toxin-neutralizing factor (LTNF). According to Lipps (1999), who tried putting LTNF into mice: Death due to intraperitoneal (IP) injection of a predetermined lethal dose ...


2

Androdioecy (the coexistence of males and hermaphrodites) is very rare in animals, and vanishingly rare in vertebrates (just three species of fish). Coexistence of males and parthenogenetic females is considerably more common, at least in insects (often in different generations). Gynodioecy (the coexistence of females and hermaphrodites) in animals is ...


2

It is a crab spider, likely of genus Xysticus but possibly genus Ozyptila. If you needed to get down to genus, bugguide (https://bugguide.net/node/view/63082) says that we can differentiate these genera by counting the macrosetae (the thick hairs) on the front legs. You would need some high-quality zoomed photos to check those. In general, eating spiders is ...


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