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Pancreatic lipase and intestinal lipase are almost same in their functions. In the intestine, the name of the lipase is a triacylglycerol acyl hydrolase it also called colipase dependent lipase or Pancreatic lipase, Free fatty acids, and 2-monoacylglycerol are the primary products of lipid digestion in the jejunum. and Pancreatic Lipase also produces Free ...


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According to Wikiwand the heterogamy occurs also in: some aphids several rotifer species Daphnia (freshwater crustacean)


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Carbonic acid from cellular respiration, like Trond mentioned, and uric acid from nitrogen metabolism, and, bone mineralization, are large sources of acid, might be enough to neutralize 3 mmol (Crooks, 1973; Tuan, 1986) CO3. Calculations 3 mmol CO3 in a chicken that weighs 45 gram when newly hatched, 45 gram * 60% = 27 g = 27 mL of water, is 3 mmol / 27 mL = ...


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Wool serves as a good insulator, meaning it doesn't allow warmth to escape the wearer easily allowing the wearer to remain warm. Furthermore, wool helps maintain a dry environment by absorbing moisture from the air (and sweat) which can also keep you cool during summer. Here's a link that talks more about this for both wool wearers and sheep: https://...


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The overwhelming cause of death of small animals ( and deer) that I see is that fearsome predator , the Toyota, Ford, Chevy, etc; AKA roadkill. I am in suburban E.TX. Other than that ,Coopers Hawks are common here and take many small birds. Also barred Owls are common and they are eating something. I think it is politically incorrect to estimate how many ...


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In the terms of the question, this can be regarded as calcium hydroxide, with the carbonate being in the form of calcium carbonate. Calcium hydroxide is a stronger base (pH of aqueous solution at 1mm = 11.27) than carbonic acid is an acid (pH of aqueous solution at 1mm = 4.68), so that 1mm calcium carbonate has a pH of 9.91. (Values from Aquion) Calcium ...


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This is probably WAAAAY to late to be of any use to you but hey... So the simple answer is: Kinda. You were actually correct to intuit that the femora of birds have a limited range of motion, with most of the limb motion being provided from the "knee"-down. So you shouldn't animate bird legs the same way that you would the legs of other non-bird ...


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This is a Common Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) primary wing feather, so it is indeed from a predatory bird. The orange hue suggests that this came from a juvenile and/or female individual. Featherbase provides a good reference here. For future feather identification questions, you may wish to post them to the Found Feathers project on iNaturalist.


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I'm pretty sure It's a millipede from the Julida order, that includes 750 species distributed in the northern hemisphere. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julida


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no animal smaller than 5 cm can jump higher than 1 meter. grasshoppers and locusts have wings which supposedly disqualifies them. https://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/highest-jump-by-an-insect. The immense mechanical power that would be required for any animal to jump so high with such a small size is unbelievably high which is why they have ...


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Every 10 to 15 minutes. The youtube channal: A chick called Albert It is a good channel that is really interesting.


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Depends on the species and their age. All birds have fat reserves that can keep them alive for a relatively long time. It's when fledglings are left for many hours or days that one should start worrying about their survival. The following link explains more detail on how frequently birds must be fed, even if in your case I suppose you aren't the one feeding ...


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According to Wikipedia, the nerves cross in all the vertebrates: In vertebrates with a large overlap of the visual fields of the two eyes, i.e., most mammals and birds, but also amphibians, reptilians such as chameleons, the two optic nerves merge in the optic chiasm. Part of the nerve fibres do not cross the midline, but continue towards the optic tract of ...


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Nightingales have adapted to city noises by singing louder. Given that one function of singing is finding a mate there must indeed be a high, direct selection pressure to make oneself heard. Other birds have adapted in a similar fashion, e.g. by singing in a higher pitch, or at different times.


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