New answers tagged

6

It's probably the larval state of a tortoise beetle, or a closely related beetle. They are known to build a "faecal shield" at the end of their tail, sometimes including shed exoskeleton and any debris that sticks to it. They hold this shield over their bodies for defensive purposes that aren't fully understood. Lacewing larva look somewhat similar and also ...


1

MY main research topic is TIME in relation to biology the blue whale calf CONVERTING mothers milk to fuctional bio-mass(up to 200 pounds/day) IS amazing-if this secret could be uncovered Wikipedia says they weigh 40,000 lbs when they finish nursing, so I think the "secret" is to be really, really large. Relative to body mass, gaining 200 pounds a day is ...


0

You asked this question 4 years ago, but i randomly noticed this only now. Whell, that not parasite, not Rat King or someting. This is "setobranchies" - crayfish's cleaning organ. They struggle when crayfish move his legs, and cleaning gills from dirt and sand. I hope this information may be usefull for you, even so many years later


1

If you are asking whether some bacteria are parasites, then absolutely yes. I think this is absolutely clear and evident to any and all biologists and would require no discussion. I could expand with some examples, but they would not be very representative of the incredible diversity of parasitic bacteria. Parasitism Many bacteria parasitize and live ...


5

Following from Matthew Martin's citations, we can infer what kind of temperature management the "biological thermal windows" are for, as they travel through 4-5 inches of fat and leather: If the hippos dwell in 25'C to 30'C water for much of the day and night, they can waste energy warming up, energy which can be spent on growing, rearing young, defending ...


8

There is research to support the idea that these are areas used by the animal to regulate its body temperature. Citation: Schneider, Marion & Kolter, Lydia & Zoo, Cologne & Germany, & De, (2003). Visualisation of Body Surfaces Specialized for Heat Loss by Infrared Thermography. J. Exp. Biol. Quart. J. Exp. Physiol. Medicine Comp. Biochem. ...


0

I've been able to narrow it down to 3 species in Musteloidea, the weasel superfamily, but I think you observed a Tanuki that was suffering from scabies. 1) Tanuki / Japanese raccoon dog - 'Tanuki' - (Nyctereutes procyonoides viverrinus). Visually similar to what you observed. The feet and face in particular seems to fit with a tanuki. Tanuki are often ...


Top 50 recent answers are included