Williham Totland
  • Member for 9 years, 7 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
Is humans' height ideal?
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39 votes

Humans can, to some extent, be scaled: While most humans are two meters tall; the human body essentially works throughout the entire range from around a meter to around two and a half meters, although ...

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How do ants know where they are going without eyes?
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11 votes

Well, first off, they have eyes, so there's that. However, a lot of what ants wish to achieve can be done through a combination of a random walk and chemical trails. When ants are exploring their ...

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Reasons why living fossils exist?
7 votes

TL;DR: Living fossils are the children of long-dead fossilised creatures that were good at being alike, other animals are the children that were good at being different. The boring answer is that ...

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How did the first self replicating organism come into existence?
4 votes

This is an extremely interesting and extremely fundamental question, indeed, and thus far, biologists have failed at coming up with a satisfying answer. We know that all the parts are there, we just ...

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Can the brain influence gene expression?
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2 votes

As has been pointed out in comments, the brain can certainly affect gene expression; but so can anything in our bodies, because the blood stream is super good at carrying stuff around the body to ...

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Why can't we feel pain when the eye lid touches the eye ball?
2 votes

TL;DR: It's psychological. Pain is a tricky thing, and it's certainly possible to feel pain when pressing your eyelids against your eyeballs if you press hard enough ("hard enough" in this context is ...

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Does Human being have potential to perform parthenogenesis?
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2 votes

'Possible' is a tricky word here. There are a lot of things that are possible that just don't happen, because they are so exceedingly rare; or that happen but are unknown because they are hard to spot....

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Why and where do red blood cells die?
2 votes

To take the easiest bit first: Red blood cells are destroyed because lacking a nucleus, they aren't quite as powerful as other cells when it comes to self-repair and longevity. As for where; it ...

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Amount of blunt force to kill a person
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1 votes

TL;DR: It's highly variable. Don't go whacking people over the head. All of those things are factors, yes; the two most important ones being force and location. There are subsidiary factors, but most ...

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Reconstituting genomes of archaic tribes of humans
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1 votes

The answer is basically 'No.'. Too much mixing has happened since then. Fortunately, in most of the world we had scientists 2000 years ago describing facial features, and in part of the world (i.e. ...

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Would short term increases in oxygen lead to beneficial effects?
1 votes

Humans are pretty well suited to a 21% oxygen atmosphere (at STP). It's what our lungs are used to dealing with, and it's what brings the appropriate amount of oxygen to our brain (in particular, most ...

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Evolution of complex organs
1 votes

To put it succinctly: None of the parts of any complex organ present in humans today appeared as they are now. The parts of the organs we have now are useless in isolation because they have over the ...

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Normal death experience
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1 votes

No and no. I'm not sure what is a "natural cause" in this context, but if it's cardiac arrest caused by age-related dystrophy of the cardiac muscles, then no, there is no suffering, at least not ...

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What are the sources of energy that alcohol provides?
1 votes

Regarding energy: Going off the assumption that you are using 'alcohol' in the sense of 'alcoholic beverage', it really depends on what kind of beverage we're talking about, but all that information ...

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Accurate Human Skull Model for Educational Purpose
1 votes

The best way to ensure you're getting an accurate skull, near as I can tell, is striking the "model" part of your question, and go straight for a real skull. A cursory search revealed, for instance, ...

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Are wasps attracted to a sting
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0 votes

Tackling the second part of the question first: If a wasp is stung by another wasp, that's usually super bad for the wasp in question. Wasps are pretty good about not stinging one another, but ...

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Does sodium lower the harmful effect of potassium on kidneys?
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0 votes

Chemically speaking, sodium and potassium are very, very similar, and also pretty common, and our body needs both. Due to their similar electrical properties in particular, they are used as kinds of '...

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