rumtscho
  • Member for 9 years, 3 months
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Why are so few foods blue?
9 votes

It is not that there are no blue foods, it is that the English language does not like calling foods "blue". There are no natural borders between "colors" in a colorspace, all colors we name (and ...

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Why do people feel extreme cold at different temperatures compared to other people of same body structure?
9 votes

First of all, this observation is the norm across human perception. While humans react in roughly the same way to similar stimuli (e.g. both a cranberry and a tomato are seen as red, the destruction ...

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Are these cats calico?
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7 votes

I think you are misunderstanding "color" here. When applied to cats, it doesn't literally mean a color shade as used in color theory, but "coat color" which can in fact also be a "coat pattern". The ...

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Book recommended for neurobiology
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6 votes

I can highly recommend Kandel's "Principles of neural science". I have not had any biology courses since highschool, but I was able to understand it well. It is really a book meant to teach. The style ...

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Does the human body convert water?
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5 votes

Yes, the human body "converts" water. Out of the hundreds of chemical reactions going on in the human body, there are reactions which take water as an input and "react it away" into something else. ...

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Can you recharge without sleeping?
4 votes

No, you cannot. Although we don't know how sleep works, we know that lack of sleep is very devastating to the body, and nothing (including laying in bed relaxed but awake) can replace it. If a rat ...

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What comes out of this bump in this vegetable?
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4 votes

I think your vegetable is a leek, or a closely related allium. If this is the case, you are seeing its flowerbud. Congratulations, it will become quite pretty in some days, I know people who use leeks ...

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What does x in "Miscanthus × giganteus" name stand for?
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4 votes

It means that the plant is a hybrid. Having it in the middle means that it is between species of the same genus, else the × (it's not the letter x but the multiplication symbol ×) would have been in ...

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Why don't bacteria eat food leftovers?
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3 votes

First, your assumption is wrong. Bacteria multiplication is not limited by food availability only, it is one of many constraints. Oxygen availability, water availability and the absence of toxins ...

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Why do we laugh?
3 votes

It is not known for sure. But I find Hurley and Dennett's theory very convincing. Our brains are engaged full time in real-time (risky) heuristic search, generating presumtpions about what will be ...

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Are there any culinary fruits that are not botanically fruits or accessory fruits?
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3 votes

I think there aren't any, with two tentative positive results. Of course, it is hard to prove a negative. But here are my arguments: Logic. there is little reason for this to happen. A culinary ...

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Can suppression of the immune system help cure chronic diseases?
3 votes

No, this wouldn't happen. The logic of your proposition assumes that chronic diseases are caused by the strength of the immune response being insufficient to kill off the virus, resulting in a long-...

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Do plants absorb toxins from the soil?
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3 votes

Not "all of them". But yes, plants suck up water from the soil, with everything dissolved in this water - nutrients, heavy metals, poisons. And also they breathe air, and absorb stuff via this route. ...

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Why does botulinum toxin seem to be more dangerous to humans than to other mammals?
3 votes

You seem to not understand how botulism works. It is impossible for vultures (or anybody else) to get botulism from a carcass. First, you have spores. They are ubiquitous in nature, and you have ...

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Why does an autoclave need to pressurize steam?
2 votes

it would be much simpler to further heat the steam at the ambient pressure of the autoclave room You cannot do that, physically. If you put water in a closed (water-vapor-tight) container, then heat ...

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Why does inbreeding cause genetic defects, but cell division in one's own body does not?
2 votes

You say cells basically create copies of DNA all the time in our body. There may be a few mutations/errors, but it works out fine. and Why does merging two similar things cause more problems ...

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Do human cells contain only one copy of the genome?
2 votes

To address the "reason behind the question" - no, this doesn't work as you seem to assume it does. It is the whole point of sexual reproduction to have two slightly different copies of the genome. ...

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About animal ecology and one view of this in science fiction
2 votes

The answer to the question as stated is, certainly: No. Neither on a conscious level, nor at the level of instinct does an animal have the goal of keeping the ecological balance of its environment ...

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Chemical reactions at the synapse
1 votes

If you are interested it from the point of view of "chemical computations", you probably want literature which looks at signal transduction in detail. I would suggest Marks' et al textbook on signal ...

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Can the eye distinguish between pure and composite colours and how do we measure this?
1 votes

What tel explained is correct. I wanted to add that we actually see pure light in a composite way too. Note for example that the M receptor has a peak at around 550nm, and a symmetric response curve....

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Are missing limbs hereditary?
0 votes

DNA can change over time This is a terribly misleading thing to say. You don't have "your DNA", you have a few billion copies of your DNA, one for each cell 1. Within an individual, there are events (...

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