Polisetty
  • Member for 6 years, 1 month
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  • AIIMS Campus, New Delhi, Delhi, India
How does coconut water solidify into hardened coconut meat?
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11 votes

There are three types of endosperms encountered in botany - nuclear, heliobial and cellular. The endosperm of Cocos nucifera is both special and interesting. Initially, the cocunut is a nuclear ...

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Is an antivenom venomous?
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9 votes

Although it is fancy to think of antivenom as a poison for the poison, technically it is a poison only for the poison! Antivenom is developed in horses (equine) by hyperimmunizing them against the ...

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What is a microsome?
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8 votes

The first quote is correct. 'Microsome' is more of a lab term. This is because, as said they are found (re-formed) after centrifugation and as such aren't seen in an intact cell. Differential ...

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Blood clumping in mosquitos
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8 votes

Female mosquitoes need blood for laying their eggs. This actually means that they need a source of rich protein and iron for their kids and hence, prey on us. It is worthwhile for us to pause here ...

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Why don't bacterial cell walls prevent bursting when attacked by the complement?
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6 votes

Although this seems to be a simple question on the exterior, the answer is going to be confusing and unclear because we still don't know the answer exactly. Short answer - MACs are bactericidal not ...

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Why does hemoglobin electrophoresis in sickle cell trait gives two bands but not three?
5 votes

This is a really interesting question and again reminds of how ignorant we are about things as subtle as this which otherwise should have been an obvious question. First of all, although there seems ...

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Why are there no Nissl bodies in the axon?
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4 votes

Molecularly, Nissl bodies are the densely clustered ribosomes on the ER. The basophilia is due to the RNA in the ribosomes. The question you have raised is a very significant one. For perspective, I ...

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Pathophysiology of pink frothy sputum in pulmonary edema
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4 votes

Even though the fluid in pulmonary edema is a transudate, there is blood in it. This is substantiated by the fact that there are microhemorrhages in acute lung congestion and hemosiderin laden ...

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In DNA repair, how is it determined which strand contains the error?
4 votes

There are many types of DNA repair. Let us limit to the following three different types to answer this condition. 1. UV damage Exposure of a cell to UV light can result in the covalent joining of ...

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How is a T lymphocyte specific to an antigen but not specific to an epitope?
3 votes

For this answer lets restrict ourselves to T dependent MHC II mediated responses. So, an APC like a macrophage or a dendritic cell, takes in a pathogen by phagocytosis and degrades it inside the cell....

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Does class switching occur both in B cells and Plasma cells?
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3 votes

Short Answer : B-cells class switch to become Plasma cells in the germinal centre of the lymph node. Long Answer : There are two important concepts addressed in the question. One is the ...

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How does drug-induced photosensitivity work?
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3 votes

Drug induced photosensitivity (DIP) refers to the development of a cutaneous disease in response to the drug chemical in combination with light. Only the drug or light alone cannot cause the reaction ...

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How do red blood cells survive without a nucleus?
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3 votes

As explained in the previous answer, the RBC loses its nucleus only at maturity. The nucleus contains the DNA and which can in turn produce protein. No nucleus means - no protein/ mRNA synthesis. Also,...

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Are there bacteria that respire anaerobically in aerobic conditions?
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2 votes

Are there any organisms that would still perform anaerobic respiration even when shifted to aerobic conditions? Yes, there are. They are called aerotolerant anaerobes as shown in this figure on tube ...

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How is histamine useful against allergies?
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2 votes

Histamine is produced in allergic reactions. - True Histamine is produced against allergic reactions - False Okay. Lets get a few things right here first. An allergy is an inappropriate immune ...

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Pathophysiology of babinski sign in spinal cord injury?
2 votes

Short answer : If the Babinski sign is positive in adults, it indicates an upper motor neuron lesion. Long answer : The plantar reflex is an interesting reflex since it has two physiological ...

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Is the knee locking mechanism present in animals?
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2 votes

Yes, the mechanism of patellar locking does occur in quadrupeds too. Although they are 4 limbed, a major portion of the weight is borne by the hind limbs. This is known as the stay apparatus and ...

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B-cell antibody production
2 votes

Statement 1 is true and Statement 2, false. B cells, in the absence of antigenic stimulation express surface receptors(B-cell receptors or BCRs), which look like normal secreted antibodies (but these ...

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Why do typical acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (like carbamates) have a greater parasympathetic effect than a sympathetic effect?
2 votes

We were taught that ganglionic receptors have very high thresholds. So we need a very high concentration of the drug to produce the sympathetic effects. We even solved a hypothetical problem in class, ...

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Is the glomerular filtration rate, per kidney or for both?
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1 votes

The definition of GFR given in Wikipedia - Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is the volume of fluid filtered from the renal (kidney) glomerular capillaries into the Bowman's capsule per unit time. ...

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What allows the hypothalamus to detect a lack of thyroid hormones?
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1 votes

The thyroid hormone, thyroxin has a multitude of effects in various cells of the body. It is a lipophilic hormone and acts via nuclear receptors, i.e. the receptors for the hormone are not on the cell ...

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Is Plasmablast a precursor of Plasma cell?
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1 votes

Antigen activated B-cells enter the germinal centre dark zone to form centroblasts which undergo somatic hypermutation. These then form centrocytes in the light zone. The various possibilities/routes ...

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Fate of Acetyl CoA in well fed state?
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1 votes

As Roland mentioned in the comments, in the well fed state, not all of the Acyl coA is converted to Acetyl coA. This picture from Harper's Biochemistry, 29th, should come handy. It is the CPT-1 ...

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Lookup for transporter locations in humans
1 votes

This site can help you locate RNA expression of a particular gene (if you know the gene for the protein in context) in various tissues. Its called biogps. http://biogps.org/#goto=welcome Hope it ...

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Why is the penicillin/ceftriaxone hypersensitivity test only done once?
0 votes

There already has been an answer but I'd still like to clarify further. I'm assuming the OP was expecting a second skin test because type 1 hypersensitivity requires a repeat exposure. Getting exposed ...

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oversecretion of the thyroid gland
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Elevated levels of thyroid hormone in the blood is called thyrotoxicosis. If this is due to a hyperfunction of the thyroid gland, it is known as hyperthyroidism. In common parlance, these terms are ...

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Why are vegetations in Infective endocarditis common on the atrial side?
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Infective endocarditis generally develops when there is a pre-existing valvular lesion. The location where the vegetation in infective endocarditis develops is based on the pressure of the ...

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Does denaturing proteins lead to loss of epitopes?
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0 votes

Short Answer - If the same antibody works both for IHC and SDS-PAGE it either means it is monoclonal against a surface linear epitope or a polyclonal antibody. Long Answer - Starting off, there are ...

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What is the difference between Founder effect and Bottleneck effect?
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The Founder and Bottleneck effect are both examples of Genetic drift as you mention. The end result is pretty much the same, i.e., a reduction in the genetic diversity of the population. The main ...

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