Irena
  • Member for 5 years, 8 months
  • Last seen more than 2 years ago
What does the placenta consist of?
1 votes

You could’ve easily googled this, but anyway... Placenta is a composite structure made of embryonic and maternal tissues. The placenta is composed of: The chorion, which is the embryonic-derived ...

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Does the given pedigree show a Y-linked dominant trait?
-1 votes

Ok so this is how I solve a pedigree: This clearly shows that the disease is autosomal dominant. But there is one problem. An autosomal dominant pedigree has the following features: 1. Appears in ...

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Why babies cry after they are born?
1 votes

I'm answering this question (mostly) based on prior knowledge. Inside the womb, the foetus relies on the mother for oxygen i.e. it receives oxygen from the mother's bloodstream via the umbilical ...

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The drawing of genetic crosses
2 votes

The cross you're studying is Mendel's monohybrid cross. Which looks something like this. Now here, the genotype of F1 gen plants is Tt. To draw this cross, proceed exactly like you decided. Draw ...

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Why arent mosquitoes found near neem trees?
4 votes

The growing accumulation of experience demonstrates that neem products work by intervening at several stages of an insect's life. The ingredients from this tree approximate the shape and structure of ...

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What is the purpose of the outer mitochondrial membrane?
1 votes

Not sure I can help much, but as far as I know the outer mitochondrial membrane is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum as well. This help lipids (apart from proteins) to enter the mitochondria ...

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What can saliva tell about ones health?
0 votes

Well, saliva (or the rate of production of saliva in your mouth) can tell you a lot about health, but the information you acquire is extremely general, so it won't really give you an entire health ...

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What is the difference of function between palisade and spongy layers of leaf?
Accepted answer
1 votes

Well I'm assuming that you already have a fair idea of the structure of a leaf (of course, why else would you ask this question), so I'll just come straight to the point. The major difference between ...

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Why do people remove excess solution after they put on a coverslip?
Accepted answer
1 votes

Well, from personal experience, whenever there was excess solution on the glass slide, our teacher always commented that our slides were messy. So I guess the entire idea is to keep the slide neat, ...

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Where exactly is pleasure
1 votes

Well, I'm glad you're curious, but you must realise that your question is highly complex. You'd certainly have to refer to a research paper for the exact, factual information. All the same, I can tell ...

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Why are the human knees and elbows bent in an opposite direction
-3 votes

It's an amazing question, really. And you might be right about your assumption. In the womb, our legs and arms bent in the same direction. But as the foetus continued to develop, the legs and arms ...

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Explain a transpiration graph
Accepted answer
2 votes

Though I don't come across graphs like these too often, I guess the answer should be A because... From the graph, it is clear that Leaf 1 has more mass than Leaf 2 after 5 hours. This means there is ...

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What is actually systematics? What is the difference between it & taxonomy?
1 votes

To put it simply, you know that Taxonomy is the branch of biology that deals with the classification of living organisms. Systematics, on the other hand, is nothing but Taxonomy + Phylogeny (i.e ...

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