Eliane B.
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Will I hyperventilate if I breath twice as fast at an altitude with half as much oxygen as I am used to?
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11 votes

By definition, hyperventilation is a state of increased breathing where the exhaled $CO_2$ is greater than what is produced by the body. Except in artificial condition or in disease process, ...

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What is the motivation behind fluorinated pharmaceuticals?
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7 votes

Fluorine has a combination of unique chemical properties, which makes it very useful in drug design : It is small, such that replacing a C-H with a C-F is often possible, from a sterical point of ...

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Derivation for drug half life
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6 votes

Well, $Cl = R/Cp$ is correct, but $R$ is not $Cp \cdot k$. Given $X(t)$, the actual quantity (ie weight or moles) of drug in the system, $R$ should have the dimension of $\frac{dX(t)}{dt}$, that is $...

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Giga base or Giga byte
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5 votes

This refers to base pairs. File size has no particular meaning beyond practical considerations, given that it depends on the format. (For example, 2bit files use 2 bits per base, as the name ...

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Do all chromosomes in one human body contains same genome?
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5 votes

Yes, all cells contains the same genome. This is because, for a given individual, all of its cells comes from the zygote, a singular cell formed after fecondation of the maternal ovum and paternal ...

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How do nasal and aural passages connect?
4 votes

The eustachian tube connects the nasopharynx to the middle ear, on each side. The (naso)pharynx is basically the back of the mouth, and the middle ear is a cavity behing the eardum. https://en....

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What does 'kinetically accessible' mean in protein folding?
3 votes

At some point during protein folding, there may exist lower energy states from a thermodynamic perspective (lower ΔG free enegy) which are actually unreachable in a given environment, because the ...

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Which kind of drugs get absorbed through epidermis?
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3 votes

According to a review (Prausnitz2004), marketed drugs with a dermal route of administration tend to fulfil the following criteria : Small molecular size (< 500 Da) High lipophilicity Small ...

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Can the dietary fibres as chemical compounds be regarded as polymers?
3 votes

Dietary fibers are the indigestible portion of food derived from plants. Most of these are indeed polymers of sugars (that is, a chain of repeated basic unit of carbohydrate), for example cellulose, ...

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Can we develop a nucleos(t)ide analogue to cure rabies?
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3 votes

In theory that would be possible, as you mentioned the rabies virus does have its particular polymerase, and adequate inhibiting substrates could possibly be found. On the other hand, the current ...

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Enzyme inhibitors, reversible or irreversible?
3 votes

These modes of inhibition are reversible. They describe a particular modification of the working of the enzyme (change of affinity, of maximum velocity, of both) due to the reversible binding of an ...

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Low-tech or low-cost technique for quantitative estimation in enzymology
2 votes

If there is a way to: Make the replication of a common culture organism (e.g. E. coli) dependent upon the inhibitor or substrate of interest, possibly with a restrictive media. Express the enzyme of ...

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What is the source of the fat in adipose tissue?
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2 votes

The proximal source of adipocyte lipids is mainly fatty acids from circulating lipoproteins (1) after hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). LPL is activated by ApoC-II, which is present in hepatic-...

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For Penicillin Binding Proteins, why is the enzyme-peptide complex less stable than the enzyme-β-lactam complex?
2 votes

According to Foyes Principle of Medicinal Chemistry, the significant difference is the crowding of the active site by the cycle next to the lactam ring, which prevent attack on the ester and release ...

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How do metal ions acting as enzyme cofactors "find" their respective enzymes?
2 votes

The metal ions are transported across cell membranes by various mecanisms like channels, pumps or extracellular receptors for carrier protein. The loading step mostly happens in the cell. Once ...

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Quantity of hemoglobin in the cells
2 votes

The reference range for hemoglobin Hb content in whole blood is 13 - 17 g/100ml for adult men, and 12 - 16 g/100ml for adult women. There are other related metrics : the mean corpuscular hemoglobin ...

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How does having spare receptors change ED50 in an irreversible agonist
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2 votes

Irreversible antagonism is like removing receptors. If there are spare receptors, maximum effect, or any effect level, can be recovered with more ligand (because displacing the irreversible ligand is ...

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Do Gametes contain mitochondria/chloroplasts from their parent cell?
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2 votes

Is this DNA found in the mitochondria and chloroplasts coded for in the host's (animal's or plant's) DNA. No, the DNA contained in these organelles it not a subset of the nuclear genome. However, ...

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Does Goryaev's chamber have the same grid layout as the conventional counting chamber used in the West?
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2 votes

From the description at http://cldtest.ru/hdbk/chamber It appears to be functionally the same device, except the only the smallest square are marked (0.25 nL and 4 nL), and the total capacity is 90 ...

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nontechnical understanding of a mammalian expression system
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1 votes

The general principle of the expression system is simple: it is a biological machine that uses cell media as its input (i.e. a broth of simple nutrients, including the protein building blocks) to ...

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Area under the curve in a drug concentration curve
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1 votes

This definition of AUC is non-standard. The usual definition does not involve the MIC or 24h: it is the area (~ integral) of the plasma concentration curve as a function of time, from first ...

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What tests can be performed to test the purity and quality of the raw peptide HCG (Human Chorionic Gonadotropin)
1 votes

A monograph from a pharmacopeia gives a good starting point for active pharmaceutical ingredient characterization. AFAIK there is no monograph for hCG nor your actual peptide of interest, but there is ...

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Why reaginic antibodies are absent in these types of syphilis?
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1 votes

To make the diagnosis of syphilis, the most common tests fall in two categories : Non-specific tests like VDRL test & Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) test : those detect antibodies against cardiolipin, ...

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Test question regarding botany
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1 votes

These are floral formulas, a way to succinctly describe how many petals/sepals/pistils/... the flower contains, and their relations (free, fused, ...). The wikipedia page describe the meaning of each ...

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How are Mono and Diglycerides metabolized without the Free Fatty Acids of Triglycerides?
1 votes

Inside the intestinal lumen, di- and triacylglycerol are hydrolysed to free fatty acid and monoglyceride by lipase. These diffuse through the plasma membrane of enterocyte where they will used to ...

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What are some uses of oxidative/reductive power inside cells?
1 votes

This topic is quite broad, excluding energetic metabolism, there are still many reactions that use redox equivalents, whether NADH, NADPH, or FADH. Here are some paradigmatic illustrations. ...

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Can mitochondria with "depleted" mtDNA reproduce?
1 votes

Can mitochondria with "depleted" mtDNA reproduce ? If by depleted, you means reduced number of mtDNA copies, then yes, as long some copies still remain, these can be replicated. Mitochondrial ...

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Books: DNA replication
0 votes

Biochemical Pathways (G. Michal, D. Schomburg) has nice old-school schematics such as this one, in addition to the text.

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