LanceLafontaine
  • Member for 10 years
  • Last seen more than 1 year ago
What is the difference between an antibiotic and an antibacterial?
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17 votes

An antibacterial is any compound that will kill or at least slow down the growth of strictly bacteria, a domain of prokaryotes. An antibiotic is often used synonymously, but denotes a compound that ...

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Why would diffusion be faster across a non-specialised tissue?
15 votes

It would also be logical to note that a chewed tablet increases its surface-area-to-volume ratio for absorption relative to an intact tablet, for any absorptive tissue.

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Does DNA react in all of the ways most other acids do?
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14 votes

It may seem counterintuitive that deoxyribonucleic acid has nitrogenous bases. Nonetheless, nucleic acids (thus including RNA) were called that way because the phosphate backbone (linked by ...

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What is the concentration of ATP in an average cell?
11 votes

Answer This article covers the energy charge and ATP concentrations of an array of muscle cells from many different organisms. Since many factors come into play (amount of glucose available, rate and ...

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Are there viruses that affect cells across different species?
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11 votes

Firstly, it's important to recognize that "plant viruses" do not exist. There are only "viruses that affect particular plant cells", or "viruses that affect a particular cell type". You'll see why in ...

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Salmon returning to lay eggs
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10 votes

Answer The mechanism for salmon natal homing isn't exactly known, but there are really two good hypotheses out there. Salmon have an extremely good sense of smell. One hypothesis is that they retain ...

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Reproductive isolation causing evolution
9 votes

Reproductive isolation isn't exactly a cause of evolution, but rather a cause of speciation. Reproductive isolation allows for two cohorts of one species to be reproductively separated. In this case, ...

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Molecularly, why can you straighten or perm hair?
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8 votes

For straightening hair with a flat iron: This source provided by bobthejoe states that temporarily straightening hair involves the breaking of hydrogen bonds between keratin molecules within hair. ...

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How are memories stored in the brain?
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7 votes

Firstly, I'd like to emphasize that the understanding of memories and learning as we know it is still in its very early stages. In fact, the mechanisms behind short-term memory are still under intense ...

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In cancer, why do cells duplicate themselves?
7 votes

This article covers some of the key issues of cancer in layman's terms. Essential, cancer is caused by multiple mutations in key regulatory genes which function in maintaining the cell cycle. This ...

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Plumage as indicator of health in birds
6 votes

This resource provides a short list of which general components of plumage are good indicators of a healthy bird. Your pet's plumage should be. . . Soft - feathers should be strong, yet flexible. ...

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Is Batesian Mimicry a form a parasitism? To what extent is the species with real defenses harmed by the defenceless species?
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6 votes

In my own opinion, I would not classify this as parasitism, as more unpalatable species are eaten with Batesian mimicry (and eating causes death). Parasitic organisms often do not kill the host, ...

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Do all mushrooms have the same multicellular ancestor?
5 votes

All fungal species within the kingdom have the same common ancestor, which is unicellular (thought to be protistan). This common ancestor is the point at which it is thought that animals diverged, as ...

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What causes fingerprints to form and why is the pattern formed unique?
5 votes

Answer Fingerprint pattern formation has two components to it: developmental and genetic. Firstly, this article's abstract describes how fingerprints are physically formed in the womb. [...] ...

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What is the difference between "dikaryotic" and "heterokaryotic" states in the sexual lifecyles of fungi?
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5 votes

A heterokaryon is a fungal cell which has two or more genetically-distinct but allelically-compatible nuclei, as suggested by this resource, as well as this Wikipedia article. A dikaryon is a fungal ...

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DNA degradation rate
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4 votes

DNA decomposition isn't a phenomenon that is too common. In nearly all cases, DNA is broken apart to the accidental contamination with nucleases. Long-term storage of DNA in the -20 is also suggested ...

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Finding the number of chromosomes of an organism
4 votes

Answer An comprehensive online database of the chromosome numbers of all living species most likely doesn't exist. This Wikipedia article is the best and most complete reference comprising animals ...

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Electronic laboratory notebook (ELN)
3 votes

Although there are some definite advantages to physical labboos, and perhaps some legal obligations, I have been loosely using Synbiota for keeping track of general procedures to be done. It has a ...

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Death because of no radio waves
3 votes

I've never heard of such a thing, and a quick Scholar search didn't yield anything significant. In fact, artificial radio waves are used in things that usually save lives, like MRIs. If we were truly ...

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What is the name of the baboons that live in Saudi Arabia
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2 votes

These look like Hamadryas Baboons (Papio hamadryas). They also fit the geographical location.

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Can epigenetic changes affect reproductive success?
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2 votes

This article deals with the effect of phenotypic variation brought on by epigenetic patterns, and how these are inherited to the next generation. Their conclusions? Our results show that epigenetic ...

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What is the title of Darwin's paper on cellular structure?
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2 votes

Darwin had written lots of papers which dealt with fertilization (which involves single cells), as he primarily dealt with the reproduction, continuation and thus evolution of a species, but these did ...

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Is sperm contagious?
2 votes

I'm unsure about the use of the word "contagious" here. If you would describe it as an organism "catching something" from another only once, this answer applies (vaguely perhaps). One example of "...

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Is it possible to use microalgae to produce food and live on it?
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1 votes

I don't see why microalgae couldn't be a main food source (putting aside the taste factor). It contains many different lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and other essential nutrients that are ...

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Are humans more aggressive during a full moon?
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1 votes

This seems to be a piece of pseudoscience commonly seen these days. The truth is that this effect has never been statistically observed. From the Skeptics Stack Exchange site: Ivan Kelly, James ...

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Density of neurons/cells in the mouse brain
0 votes

This article seems to be at least part of what you're looking for (although I can only access the abstract at the moment). They report that: In this study the density of neurons and synapses was ...

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