Nicolai
  • Member for 4 years, 7 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
Why are there different gene expressions that are refered to the same gene in microarray experiments results?
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2 votes

What you are looking at there is a microarray dataset (see the description here). Microarrays are chips that have many sequence specific probes on them and sometimes they have multiple probes for the ...

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Where are there analyzable signed directed network datasets?
3 votes

While this does look like a very nice approach, I would actually argue that there are (almost) no biological datasets, that can be directly used for your algorithm - you can only do a sort of meta ...

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How to analyze phosphorylation shift by western blot?
1 votes

The run length of bands in an SDS-PAGE (which your western is probably based on) depends - at least in theory - only on the size of the protein: SDS binds to proteins with a fixed size ratio and ...

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How to do research in bioinformatics without wet lab experiments?
2 votes

Doing actually valuable bioinformatics research completely on your own after graduating from university (I am assuming that this corresponds to a master's degree) is somewhere between impossible and ...

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What does it mean that the transcript is enriched?
2 votes

In the context of transcriptomics the term 'enrichment' is usually connected to differential analysis: If a transcript (or some/all transcripts of a gene) are detected in a given sample that ...

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It there any experimental approach to determine the electronic structure of a given aminoacid inside a protein?
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1 votes

The two most often used methods used to determine protein structures are X-Ray crystallography and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy). Both of these allow some deductions of electron ...

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What prevents mRNAs that are localized to a specific part of the cell from being translated before they reach their destination?
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2 votes

The answer to your general question is 'it depends': A lot of RNA localisation to the ER and mitochondria happens co-translationally (based on the protein targeting sequences), so these mRNA actually ...

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What percentage of RNA splicing happens during transcription?
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3 votes

I don't think it will be possible to give a conclusive answer to this question, because a) it's a matter of active research and b) the rate / percentage of transcripts that are fully spliced co-...

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DNA described somewhere?
1 votes

This question is both easy and hard to answer: DNA and its (known) functions have been described in scientific literature, textbooks and databases for the last few decades, but because this is a ...

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Do new neurons divide propotionally?
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5 votes

It seem's you are assuming that your / the adult human brain produces new neurons over time- this is (largely) incorrect: neurons are non-dividing cells and are all formed throughout embryogenesis and ...

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What is the substance that tumors release that stimulates growth of blood vessels but suppresses its release from other tumors?
1 votes

One very important signal for angiogenesis are the Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) (a small group of ~5 similar proteins). They generally promote generation of new blood vessels & ...

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Which one is better to use for water stress experiment GWAS or RNASeq?
1 votes

bambara groundnut does not have a reference genome This is your biggest problem if you want to do any sequencing based analysis. Neither GWAS nor RNAseq data analysis are possible without a ...

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What do we mean by MHC molecule diversity? Does each human have a variety of MHC molecule isoforms?
1 votes

You're right that both polygeny and polymorphism contribute to the diversity of a given gene in the population correctly described what they mean individually. However, you missed that the polygeny ...

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Can 1.5 gigabytes encoded in the human genome really account for the complexity of a human being?
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3 votes

This is a VERY hard question to answer; I think mostly because it is very hard to think about how the DNA actually encodes information. The first important thing to note (and also the only direct ...

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Where can I obtain the sequence of the E. coli ribosomal RNA precursor?
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2 votes

Generally most organisms have multiple copies of the genes/regions coding for ribosomal RNA (since it's needed quite a lot). Additionally these regions can be repetitive or otherwise similar to ...

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Studying the epigenetic variability, can I use SNPs?
3 votes

Starting from what appears to be your main question: Can I use SNPs associated with a gene's higher expression to compute the likelihood of that gene being expressed in the brain region? I would ...

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Why didn't these scientists restore electrical activity in this pig's brain?
2 votes

Restarting electrical activity would mean that at least parts of the brain become active again and possibly restoration of almost all cognitive functions. While this would be a tremendous scientific ...

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How could pharmaceutical metabolizing bacteria be used to synthesize them?
1 votes

In principle yes, because almost all reactions exist in an equilibrium and enzymes are catalysts (meaning they affect mainly the activation energy for a specific reaction). The best approach is to ...

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Selective breeding fluorescent sheep - possible?
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2 votes

Natural horizontal gene transfer in higher animals is possible, but still very rare. If any transfer happens then it's usually from micro-organsims (viruses/bacteria) or parasites to the host animal (...

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How does bonding between non-complementary bases occur?
1 votes

How do the two bases that aren't complementary remain bonded? Non complementary bases can only form non-Watson-Crick bonds, which are very unstable and noticeably different. Therefore any mismatch in ...

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GEN file format, SNPs and alleles
2 votes

From what I could find the .gen file format for SNPs was developed for the IMPUTE2 program and is generally meant to be a flexible file format for SNP data. The description of the file format is ...

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Does the mutation CCR5-delta 32 increase the genetic info?
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5 votes

Whether or not a mutation changes the 'amount' (meaning the size of the genome) of genetic information present in an individual depends on the type of mutation and is independent on which gene is ...

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Does the theory of evolution fail to explain people sacrificing their lives for their enemies?
2 votes

And above all, some of us are ready to forfeit their lives from their love to their enemies. This contradicts the survival instinct; such an absurd act cannot be explained with Darwin's theory. There ...

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From refseq ids to Go term Ids
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1 votes

So, I've looked a bit into this and the way you want to do your analysis won't work as you planned it. The main reason for this is that the GO database does not contain any virus species (as fas as I ...

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Could bone marrow transplants help make xenotransplants viable?
-1 votes

No, this will likely never work - but chimeric trans plantations of 'humanised' organs might become possible. Firstly, the process of injecting human/patient cells into an embryo would - if it works -...

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Can someone help me interpret these charts on fluorescent polarization?
1 votes

These charts are flow cytometry graphs, something not explicitly stated in the figure description, but obvious to everyone who has seen similar graphs before (and I assume it's at least mentioned in ...

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Does sex-chromosomes exist in all the cells in a human body?
8 votes

Like the other answer already said: yes, all cells in the human body contain all 2x 23 chromosomes (with the exception of cells that loose all nuclear DNA during maturation, like red blood cells, or ...

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qPCR: Accounting for different sample mass when interpreting and comparing Ct
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0 votes

If you are always using a relativ amount of your input yield for each sample, then you'll need to correct your Ct values for the absolute DNA yield of each sample. If you can't measure the DNA yield ...

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Why can't complex multicellular organisms reproduce by regeneration?
4 votes

Not all complex organisms are incapable of regeneration! The most famous example is probably the axolotl - a salamander that is able to regrow whole limbs or even parts of essential organs like the ...

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DIYbio - CRISPR injection sites for targeting the ABCC11 gene
0 votes

Okay, I didn't want to write an answer to this, because honestly - don't do try this at home. You have to realise that what Zayner (who does incidentally have a PhD in biochemistry) does is not risk ...

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