Nicolai
  • Member for 4 years, 8 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
What's the state of the art in designing and creating your own life forms?
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This answer is mostly meant to be an addition to nico's answer, which while correct and on the point, does not completely cover what we can do nowadays. 1) What features can be easily inserted ...

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Why does the protection afforded by some vaccines last longer than for others?
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The first thing I want to make clear is that, the B and T that "will only float around in circulation for a short period of time before dying and being replaced", are not the ones that have already ...

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Is it possible to induce protein activation via frequency-specific mechanical waves?
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This should defentily be possible and most likely already exists in the form of touch or pain receptors. In the case of mechanical nocireceptors, which sense pressure or other mechanical changes in ...

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How would our circadian rhythm change over time if we had no sunlight whatsoever?
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Say we can live for 10,000 years, how would our circadian rhythm be different 10,000 years from now after zero exposure to sunlight? Probably almost the same. A circadian rhythm has - by definition -...

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Definition of the different DNA regions
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We can take a look at the following picture (from wikipedia): The regions are then: intergenic: everything outside of the shown gene region <5 Kb downstream: outside of the transcribed region, ...

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How can cancer preventing genes from animals be transferred to humans?
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While this research is interesting and might help curing cancer at some point, it's not a ground breaking revelation. The gene in question here is TP53, coding for the very-well known tumor supressor ...

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Example of impossibility in the nested hierarchy?
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While evolution generally predicts a nested hierarchy for shared traits of organisms, it's not generally that simple - there are some cases that can lead to exceptions of strictly nested hierarchy. ...

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Is O4I2 sufficient to reprogram cells (ie induce pluripotency)?
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No, the chemical O4I2 (thats a name, not a chemical formula btw) only helps to induce production of the Oct-4 transcription factor. Even if just this chemical is sufficient to express Oct-4 (which it ...

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How to selectively filter BLAST results for an endogenous retroviral LTR to retrieve members of the same ERV family?
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I don't think there is a definite answer to this problem, but here are a few things that might help you, apart from a simple length filter for the hits: Filter for regions: since LTRs are repeats you ...

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does small different between 16s ribosomal DNA leads to diffrence into protein products?
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The 16s ribosomal DNA does not code for any protein, it codes for the 16s ribosmal RNA, which is part of the (small subunit of the) ribosome. The differences will most likely not affect the ribosome ...

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Blood transfusion
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In theory it's possible to change the blood types A & B into O, since the antigens for them have longer sugar chains than the O antigen (as seen on this picture from wikipedia). The problem is ...

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Is it true that the human brain has not evolved in 100 000 years?
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Every part of the human genome is constantly evolving - but at a VERY slow rate. Therefore there are only a few changes from the last 100k years (This article describes this quite well). Intelligence ...

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Definition of Cis-eqtl
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Kind of. What you describe is a cis-eQTL, but the exact distance (1Mb in each direction, 1Mb total, ...) and the definition of the location of the gene (TSS, transcript borders, ...) depend on ...

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Why doesn't local anesthesia affect muscles?
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The answer to this question boils down to 'because local anesthesia does not interrupt the nerves themselves'. From the wiki article on local anesthetics (LA): All LAs are membrane-stabilizing ...

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Where to start understanding chemical principles of human body?
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If you want to start from the chemistry upwards I'd recommend you to either look into a biochemistry textbook (buy or borrow one/get a used one, since they are quite expensive) or look for some (...

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Can I grow unlimited stem cells from limited embryonic stem cells?
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Like I said in my comment stem cell culture is a very difficult process, and while people have been doing research on this for about two decades there is still a lot we don't know about stem cells. ...

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A compound was proposed by error but then showed very good inhibitory properties. How to argue this in a manuscript?
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Be honest (and possibly split the papers). If the compound was identified as an error and you want to include in a paper describing the process of your simulation and the effectiveness of the ...

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Cloning DNA fragment - at least trying to
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The fragment size itself shouldn't be a problem in principle. Cloning has many steps, so anything you didn't specifically test could be causing problems. If different vectors are also not the problem,...

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how do microtubules polymerize?
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Microtubules are made up by $\alpha$- and $\beta$-tubulin units, the wiki page for this will link you to a short section on microtubule dynamics, which is the basis of how the growth & shrinking ...

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Predict if a given protein is recognized by antibodies
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The answer of polonio210 is an excellent summary of bioinformatic tools, that allow comparisons with databases of known antibodies - which is helpful to find a specific antibody that could bind your ...

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Why high quality DNA should be between 10 and 20 kb?
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The website specifically talks about DNA samples intended for sequencing. The DNA in these samples was/is/will be extracted from cells and this extraction procedure leads to fragmentation (breaking ...

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What is allele-specific gene expression?
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There are a few well known examples of allelic exclusion (which is what you've described): In females (human and probably other mammals too) one of the two X-chromosomes is silenced (shut down) ...

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Flow Cytometry to learn about Cell cycle
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The basis of analysing flow cytometry data in regard to the cell cycle is the fact that DNA synthesis occurs in S-phase and therefore cells before S-Phase (G0/G1) have half the amount of DNA compared ...

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Chemical methods to detect cell division
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The most common indicator for the growth of any kind of cell (population) I know of is the amount of DNA in that cell. There are a number of (fluorescent) dyes that bind to DNA in a stoichiometric ...

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Do all parts of a plant contain the same type of cell?
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The diagram shows an exemplary plant cell . Except for the raphide/druse crystals, which I do not know, all of these components are definitely present in every plant cell. Do note that this diagram is ...

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qPCR: Accounting for different sample mass when interpreting and comparing Ct
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If you are always using a relativ amount of your input yield for each sample, then you'll need to correct your Ct values for the absolute DNA yield of each sample. If you can't measure the DNA yield ...

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DIYbio - CRISPR injection sites for targeting the ABCC11 gene
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Okay, I didn't want to write an answer to this, because honestly - don't do try this at home. You have to realise that what Zayner (who does incidentally have a PhD in biochemistry) does is not risk ...

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You need DNA to make RNA, and RNA to make DNA, so they had to come into existence at the same time?
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I'm reading your questions as: Since DNA and RNA co-depend on each other, which one existed first in the course of evolution The honest answer to this is: we don't really know. The RNA world ...

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Isolating a specific gene (specifically TRAV* series of genes) for sequencing
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Restriction enzymes are usually only used when you do molecular cloning using plasmids or other forms of shorter DNA moleclues, since - like you said - using them on genomic DNA would cut it into much ...

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API for gene names by location
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The NCBI as an API called 'E-utilities' (see short intro) that allows access to almost all their databases. It's a bit tricky to get used to it (and sometimes it wants stupid - even discontinued - ...

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